A Lectio Divina Approach to the Sunday and Weekday Liturgy

 

BREAKING THE BREAD OF THE WORD (Series 10, n.6)

WEEK BEFORE EPIPHANY: January 1-7, 2012 *

 

(N.B. The pastoral tool BREAKING THE BREAD OF THE WORD: A LECTIO DIVINA APPROACH TO THE SUNDAY LITURGY includes a prayerful study of the Sunday liturgy of Year B from three perspectives. For reflections on the Sunday liturgy based on the Gospel reading, please scroll up to the “ARCHIVES” above and open Series 1. For reflections based on the Old Testament reading, open Series 4. For reflections based on the Second Reading, open Series 7.

 

Series 10 presents A LECTIO DIVINA APPROACH TO THE WEEKDAY LITURGY: January 1-7, 2012. The following reflections are based on the weekday liturgy’s Gospel reading.)

 

***

 

January 1, 2012 (Sunday): MARY, THE HOLY MOTHER

OF GOD

 “Delving into the Christmas Mystery: Mary at the Heart

of the Incarnation”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Nm 6:22-27 // Gal 4:4-7 // Lk 2:16-21

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

On the Octave of Christmas, we celebrate the oldest Marian feast in the Church, the solemnity of Mary, Mother of God. In this Marian feast we celebrate her intimate role in the Christmas mystery as the willing virgin who gave birth to the Son of God. Cardinal Leon Joseph Suenens remarks: “We find Mary at the very heart of the mystery of the incarnation. She is the mother of the one who will be for all future ages the way, the truth, and the life. The threshold of the one who, above all, can introduce us to Jesus … One cannot see the child apart from his mother, nor the mother apart from the child; for the mystery of the incarnation only yields its full meaning through the faithful cooperation and humble willingness of her whom tradition calls Theotokus. Today’s world needs to rediscover the face of its Savior and of his mother. The world is glutted with philosophies and ideologies which, no matter what they have to offer, do not answer its most vital need, its most fundamental questions. To our contemporary world Mary offers the living and vibrant reality, the incarnate Savior of the world.”

 

The solemnity of Mary, Mother of God, falls on New Year (January 1), the first day of the civil year. New Year’s Day is an occasion when people look back on the past and wish each other God’s abundant blessings. It is most opportune that the First Reading for the New Year’s Mass is the “Priestly Blessing” from the book of Numbers. Prayed in the context of the Christmas-Marian feast, it evokes the truth that Mary, Mother of God, is the utmost recipient of God’s blessing. In the motherhood of Mary, the icon of the blessed of God, the fullness of blessing is given to the world through her divine Child, the Savior of the world and the Priest of the New Covenant.

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Do we take time to contemplate the marvelous Christmas mystery and the vital role of Mary, Mother of God, in the mystery of salvation? Do we truly thank the Lord for the great “benediction” granted us in Jesus, the Son of Mary?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Loving Father, we thank you for Mary of Nazareth. She gave her flesh and blood to the divine Word and your Son Jesus was formed in her womb. He is the Savior of the world. How wonderful is the birth of the Christ from the virgin mother! How lovely is the Marian rosebush and how beautiful is the Rose of Judah that bloomed from it! Mary is at the heart of the Christmas mystery. Through Jesus Christ whom she bore, the fullness of blessings is given to the world. By her maternal intercession, let the New Year 2012 be filled with love, joy and peace. May we truly love and serve Mary’s Son, now and forever. Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“The shepherds went in haste to Bethlehem and found Mary and Joseph, and the infant lying in the manger.” (cf. Lk 2:16))

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Pray that the people of today may deeply know, love and serve Jesus, the Son of God, born of Mary. Let your filial devotion to Mary be expressed in concrete ministry of charity to the unfortunate, especially the underprivileged children.

 

***

 

 

January 2, 2012 (Monday): SAINTS BASIL THE GREAT and GREGORY NAZIANZEN, bishops and doctors, memorial

 “Delving into the Christmas Mystery: His Sandals

I Am Not Worthy to Untie”

 

BIBLE READINGS

I Jn 2:22-28 //  Jn 1:19-28

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

In this Christmas season we continue to penetrate the meaning of Jesus Savior, the Father’s gift of love to us. The precursor, John the Baptist, proclaimed the coming of the Messiah, whose sandals he felt unworthy to untie. Jesus is the light and John is the lamp that reflects it; the Son of God is the saving word and the prophet in the wilderness is the voice that proclaims it. Indeed, Christ must increase and the one who prepares his way must decrease. Jesus is “the Greater One”. Like John the Baptist, we must recognize the preeminent status of Jesus Christ and assume our subordinate position in relation to him. Jesus Christ is the holy and immortal one to whom our love, reverence and unconditional trust are due. The spirit of Christmas invites us to render our homage, adoration and service to the Son of God.

 

When I was assigned in India, I looked forward to the visit of a little old lady from a fishing tribe in Bombay. The Sisters fondly called her “Granny”. Like the other women of her tribe, Granny wore her “sari” in a peculiar way – one end tucked between her legs. She would be served breakfast by the kind Sisters, usually the regular fare of cooked beans and a small loaf of bread. I was fascinated by the way Granny responded to the gift of bread. She would receive and hold it with reverence. Then she would make a sign of the cross over it and lift up her gaze to pray a silent blessing. If that is how Granny responded to the gift of material bread, one could just imagine her awesome reverence before the Blessed Sacrament on the altar. Her devout expression and gestures manifested that she was truly before the sacramental presence of Jesus Christ, whose sandal strap we are not worthy to untie.

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Do I truly recognize the absolute grandeur and absolute excellence of Jesus Christ, whose sandals we are not worthy to untie? How do I respond to his presence?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Loving Father, we thank you for John the Baptist who witnessed that the Messiah is “the Greater One”, whose sandal strap he was not worthy to untie. Teach us to perceive the presence and vital role of Christ in salvation history and to recognize his grandeur. Jesus is the refulgence of the Father’s glory and to him we offer reverently the homage of our love and service. Help us imitate John the Baptist in his serving stance to Christ our Savior, who lives and reigns forever and ever. Amen.

 

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“There is one among you … whose sandal strap I am not worthy to untie.” (cf. Jn 1:27)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Pray that we may always take a reverential attitude of service in relation to Christ. By your spirit of humility and service to the people around you, enable them to experience that Christ is “Greater One” who deserves the gift of our entire being.

 

 

January 3, 2012 (Tuesday): THE MOST HOLY NAME OF JESUS, optional memorial

 “Delving into the Christmas Mystery: Behold,

the Lamb of God”

 

BIBLE READINGS

I Jn 2:29-3:6 // Jn 1:29-34

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

When John the Baptist saw Jesus coming to him, he exclaimed: “Behold, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world.” The “Great One”, whose sandals John felt unworthy to untie, comes to the world on a compassionate mission of salvation. He is the “Lamb” who liberates from the power of evil and death. On the night of the Exodus, the Israelites smeared the doorposts of their homes with a lamb’s blood to avert the death of the first born. The angel of destruction “passed over” their homes and the angel’s “passing over” was an experience of salvation. By the blood of the sacrificial lamb the Chosen People were saved.

 

On Christmas night, the shepherds taking care of the flocks heard from the angel of the Lord the good news of salvation: “Christ the Savior is born”. Mary’s “first born” son would be identified many years later by John the Baptist as the “Lamb of God” who takes away the sin of the world. By the blood poured out by Jesus, the Lamb of God, the whole world is saved and the wounds caused by evil and sin are healed.

 

The saving work of Jesus continues in the here and now as the beautiful Christmas story reported here will show (cf. Dani D’Angelo, “The Gift of Quitting” in Amazing Grace for the Catholic Heart, ed. Jeff Cavins, et. al., West Chester: Ascension Press, 2004, p. 167-169).

 

On Christmas morning, my little boy asked me what I was giving the Baby Jesus for His birthday. I was crushed as I had nothing. I had not baked our customary birthday cake for Baby Jesus, nor had we stored up our good deeds to fill the manger with straw, like in years past. I felt bad but the look on my son’s face told me he felt worse. The next thing out of my mouth surprised even me.

 

“I know”, I said impulsively. “I am giving Baby Jesus my smoking habit. The whole thing: the cigarettes, the lighters, the cravings, the crabbiness, the ashtrays both dirty and clean, everything about smoking - is what I am giving to Baby Jesus.”

 

He was delighted and ran to tell his sister. They were filled with such joy while I sat stunned at what I had just done. I was obsessed with cigarettes yet I had told my son that I was giving up smoking as a gift to the Baby Jesus. Was I nuts? Could I do it? “No way”, I thought. But I knew that to break such a promise to my son would haunt us both for years to come. I needed a miracle. “Look Jesus”, I prayed. “I am sorry for jumping the gun, but I made this promise to my child. Now I need You to help me keep it.”

 

Suddenly I was filled with a deep sense of sureness. The kids and I had a ball going from room to room collecting everything to do with cigarettes. There were packs hidden everywhere – five in the freezer alone. We took the cigarettes, lighters, and ashtrays and either gave or throw them away. Then I went from room to room taking down curtains and cleaning them. I washed walls, ceilings, clothing and everything I could find, from Christmas morning until well into the New Year. (…) That was the year of my Christmas miracle and it changed my life completely … I gave up smoking as a gift to Baby Jesus, but in turn it was a gift He gave to me.

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Do we welcome Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God, into our life and embrace his saving power? What areas in our life need to be liberated by him?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

O gracious Father, we thank you for the gift of your Son Jesus, the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world. He is the savior of the world and frees us from self-destruction and all the evil forces that threaten us. Teach us to be gentle and gracious to the saving Lamb. Help us to welcome him joyfully into our life and give ourselves to him, now and forever. Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“Behold the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world.” (cf. Jn 1:29b)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Pray that people may graciously welcome the daily coming of the Lamb of God in our life. By your acts of justice and charity to those struggling with various addictions, enable them to experience the saving power of the compassionate Lamb of God.

 

 

***

 

 

January 4, 2012 (Wednesday): SAINT ELIZABETH ANN SETON, religious, memorial (USA)

“Delving into the Christmas Mystery:

They Followed Jesus”

 

BIBLE READINGS

I Jn 3:7-10 // Jn 1:35-42

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

Saint John declared in the Gospel prologue: “And the Word became flesh and made his dwelling among us” (Jn 1:14). The Incarnate Word Jesus Christ is the “Lamb of God” pointed out by the precursor, John the Baptist, to two of his disciples. Indeed, the title “Lamb of God” evokes images of the sacrificial lamb, the suffering Servant in whom Yahweh is well pleased, and the Good Shepherd.

Jesus Christ thus initiates the dialogue of discipleship: “What are you looking for?” The response of Andrew and his companion is not totally an answer, but a question pregnant with meaning: “Where are you staying?”  Their question means, “Where can we find you and learn from you about our true home?” Jesus says in reply, “Come and see.” He offers an invitation to walk with him and learn what remaining with him entails, as well as our final destiny. Indeed, the positive and ready response of the disciples to his invitation is extremely inspiring: “They went and saw where Jesus was staying, and they stayed with him.” As the Word made flesh dwelt among us and stayed with us through his eternal healing presence, so the first disciples remained with Jesus, the incarnate Word and divine Teacher.

Having experienced the life-giving intimacy and power of Jesus, the Word of life, the disciple Andrew became a sharer of the Word. His inevitable response is to find someone else to share the joy of his personal encounter with the Messiah. His effort to share the Word incarnate with his brother Simon Peter bore abundant fruit.

The following story gives insight into a disciple’s ministry of sharing the Word and of bringing the saving presence of Christ to others (cf. Chaplain Samuel Boone, “The Ministry of Presence” in GUIDEPOSTS, December 2011, p. 58).

Christmas time can be lonesome for soldiers. I remember being stuck on an Army base in Germany one Christmas Eve with a case of the flu. My buddies went out partying while I could barely move from my bunk. The one person who dropped by was a chaplain. “Son”, he said, “you look like you could use some chicken soup.”

I didn’t put much stock in religion then, but the fact that this was a busy man – he had a Christmas Eve service to put on after all – made time to see me made an impression. He even brought by some of his wife’s chicken soup. That’s what military chaplains call the ministry of presence. You cant’ expect the soldiers under your care to waltz into your office. You’ve got to reach them where they are: in the mess hall, at their posts, in the barracks.

That good man changed my life. I got well, dropped by the chapel, made a profession of faith and eventually became a chaplain myself.

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Do I endeavor to really follow Jesus and invite others to follow him?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Almighty Father, we thank you for Jesus Christ, the Lamb of God. His gentle and compassionate presence inspires love and affection. Like Andrew and John, we are fascinated and seek him. And so we respond to Jesus’ invitation, “Come and see” and follow him. Help us to bring forth his saving presence and invite others to follow him. Grant us the grace to remain with him, forever and ever. Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“They followed Jesus.” (cf. Jn 1:37b)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Pray for the increase and perseverance of priestly and religious vocations. By a Christ-centered life, marked by charity and faithful service, enable the people around you to feel the saving presence of Christ and yearn to follow him.

 

***

 

 January 5, 2012 (Thursday): SAINT JOHN NEUMAN, bishop, memorial (USA)

“Delving into the Christmas Mystery: The Call Resounds”

 

BIBLE READINGS

I Jn 3:11-21 // Jn 1:43-51

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

Philip received a direct call from Jesus of Nazareth, “Follow me”. Like Andrew, Philip believed he had found the Messiah in the person of Jesus of Nazareth and therefore invited Nathanael, “Come and see”. Skeptical but sincere in his search for truth, Nathanael went to see Jesus who commended him as an Israelite without guile or falsehood. Nathanael was astonished by Jesus’ intimate knowledge of his personal integrity. He became even more impressed when Jesus told him that before Philip called him, he was sitting under the fig tree. According to Jewish tradition, the rabbis studied the law “under the fig tree”. Thus Nathanael, a man intent on studying Scripture and receptive to the coming of the Messiah, became a disciple of Jesus.

 

The celebration of the Christmas mystery invites us to share the joy of the coming of Jesus the Messiah and to a deeper contemplation of the divine plan of salvation. One way to achieve this is through Christmas carols. The following article, circulated through the Internet, about the well-loved Christmas carol “The Twelve Days of Christmas” invites us to cherish the various elements of Christian faith, which we should ponder “under the fig tree”.

 

From 1558 until 1829, Roman Catholics in England were not permitted to practice their faith openly. Someone during that era wrote this carol as a catechism song for young Catholics. It has two levels of meaning plus a hidden meaning known only to members of their church. Each element in the carol has a code word for a religious reality which the children could remember.

 

-         The partridge in a pear tree was Jesus Christ.

-         The two turtle doves were the Old and New Testaments.

-         Three French hens stood for faith, hope and love.

-         The four calling birds were the four gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke and John.

-         The five golden rings recalled the Torah or Law, the first five books of the Old Testament.

-         The six geese a-laying stood for the six days of creation.

-         The seven swans a-swimming represented the sevenfold gift of the Holy Spirit: prophecy, serving, teaching, exhortation, contribution, leadership and mercy.

-         The eight maids a-milking were the eight beatitudes.

-         Nine ladies dancing were the nine fruits of the Holy Spirit: love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness and self-control.

-         The ten lords a-leaping were the ten commandments.

-         The eleven pipers piping stood for the eleven faithful disciples.

-         The twelve drummers drumming symbolized the twelve points of belief in the Apostles’ Creed.

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Are we eager, like Andrew and Philip, to share our experience of Christ with others? Are we intent to study Scripture and, like Nathanael, are we receptive to the coming of the Messiah?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Lord Jesus, we thank you for calling Philip and for his eagerness to share his messianic joy with Nathanael. Help us to live without guile and with personal integrity. Teach us how to sit “under the fig tree” and learn the Scripture with a devout heart so that we may truly welcome you as our saving Lord. Grant that we may share your word and resound your call so that all may know, love and follow you. You live and reign forever and ever. Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“We have found the one about whom Moses wrote in the law, and also the prophets, Jesus, son of David, from Nazareth.” (cf. Jn 1:45)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Pray that people of good will may continue to study the Scripture and find wisdom and strength in it. By your word and deeds promote vocation awareness and response in your parish and other types of community.

 

***

 

 January 6, 2012 (Friday): SAINT ANDRE BESSETTE, religious, optional memorial (USA)

“Delving into the Christmas Mystery: The Son of Adam, the son of God”

 

BIBLE READINGS

I Jn 5:5-13 // Lk 3:23-38

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

Today’s Gospel reading (Lk 3:23-38) presents the genealogy of Jesus Christ, the son of Adam, the Son of God. The purpose of this list of ancestry is to show from the beginning that Jesus brings salvation for all the children of Adam. In presenting a line of ancestors which goes back to Adam, “son of God”, the evangelist Luke emphasizes Jesus’ universal sonship. By his incarnation and by undergoing the paschal mystery of his passion, death and glorification, the divine Son Jesus deeply immersed himself into the current of salvation history and became the principle of a redeemed and renewed humanity.

 

In this Christmas season we contemplate the genealogy of Jesus Christ as a powerful manifestation of his intimate participation in the vicissitudes of humanity. The immersion of our Savior Jesus in the painful human lot continues in the “here and now” as the following letter of the PDDM Sisters would show. The Sisters are writing from Iligan City, Philippines, which was devastated this December by a typhoon and flash flood just a few days before Christmas.

 

Christmas 2011

 

Greetings of Peace!

 

It will be a simple and austere Christmas for us PDDM Sisters here in Iligan City.

·        No Christmas lights because there is still no electricity in most places.

·        No Christmas Tree because the trees were cut by illegal loggers and caused flash floods.

·        No Belen for the Holy Family because most houses were destroyed and washed out.

·        No caroling because the children lost their voices crying for help.

·        No ham and Queso de Bola because food is rationed to the survivors who wait for hours to receive their share.

·        No soft drinks because water is running out to quench the thirst of the victims.

 

Jesus will be born tonight in the evacuation centers … Yet this will be the most meaningful and real Christmas ever because of the love, sharing, and concern of people for each other. Indeed, God is with us and is dwelling among our suffering sisters and brothers.

 

 Thank you for being one with us in your prayers, help and loving concern. Have a blessed and meaningful Christmas everyone …

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Do we realize how deeply the divine Son Jesus is involved in the human lot? Do we endeavor to be united with Jesus in his mission to save us all?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Lord Jesus, you are the son of Adam, the “son of God”. We thank you for immersing yourself into the deep current of human history, which is turbulent and troubled with cares and sinfulness. You are our salvation! Grant that we may extend your saving help to the needy and distressed people of today’s fragmented society. Help us to alleviate the suffering of the victims of war, hatred, and various calamities. You are our loving and protecting Brother. Through you, with you and in you, we are the children of God whom we love and adore, now and forever. Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“He was the son of Adam, the son of God.” (cf. Mk 1:11)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Pray for our suffering brothers and sisters that people of good will may respond to their needs and alleviate their misery. Endeavor to assist the devastated people in Iligan City and Cagayan de Oro in the Philippines with your prayers and material aid.

 

***

 

January 7, 2012 (Saturday): SAINT RAYMOND PENYAFORT, priest, optional memorial

“Delving into the Christmas Mystery: An Epiphany of Love

and Mercy”

 

BIBLE READINGS

I Jn 2:18-21 // Ps 96:1-2,11-13 // Jn 1:1-18

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

When I heard this true story, I shuddered at the senselessness and viciousness of what had happened. A wedding feast was held in the town near our convent. The bridegroom’s party, which, in the Filipino tradition, is usually the one responsible for the expenses of the wedding banquet, provided what was necessary for the feast. But there were so many guests that the food and drink ran out. The bride’s relatives taunted the bridegroom for not having provided enough. The bridegroom “lost face” and was overwhelmed with shame (“hiya”). In the evening, they found the humiliated and tormented bridegroom-host hanging from a tree. He killed himself out of desperation and shame. What was meant to be a joyful event became a tragedy.

 

            In light of this story, which took place in an Oriental context, it is easy to imagine how unfortunate and critical the situation was of the wedding party at Cana when the wine was running out. Harold Buetow comments: “To run out of wine at a wedding was more of a humiliation for the couple than it would be today. For one thing, hospitality in the East was a sacred duty; for another, running out of wine would show poor planning, or – worse - the couple’s lack of prosperity, which would mean the absence of God’s blessing.”

 

In this distressing situation, Jesus Christ dramatically manifested the compassion and the saving power of God by changing water into wine, thus prefiguring the abundant joy and intense happiness of the messianic age that he would bring. At the wedding of Cana, there was a renewed epiphany of God’s love and mercy through the miraculous intervention of his beloved Servant - Son, fully consecrated to the realization of the divine redemptive plan.

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

When we are experiencing the poverty of having “no more wine” of gladness in our life, what do we do? Do we turn to Christ, the source of eucharistic wine and messianic joy?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

Leader: Lord Jesus, Bridegroom of the Church,

at the wedding of Cana you changed water into wine

and gave us a “sign” of your paschal destiny and glory.

Look kindly on our poverty

and be mindful of our concerned cry,

“We have no wine!”

Fill us with the sparkling wine of joy

that comes from your bounty and self-sacrificing love.

As the gracious Master of the Eucharistic feast of the Church,

increase in us the resolve

to share intimately in the messianic banquet

which presupposes a new world, a new wine, a new love,

and the new people of God made one in the joy of the kingdom.

We love you and adore you

for you have prepared for us

the Eucharistic banquet of joy-giving wine and life-giving bread.

You live and reign forever and ever.

Assembly: Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“Jesus did this as the beginning of his signs at Cana in Galilee and so revealed his glory.” (cf. Jn 2:11a)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Pray for engaged couples participating in pre-Cana formative activities and those who will be married today. By your acts of mercy and compassion to struggling and troubled families, enable them to experience the presence of Christ and the cup of joy.

 

 

***

 

 

Prepared by Sr. Mary Margaret Tapang  PDDM

 

 

PIAE DISCIPULAE DIVINI MAGISTRI

SISTER DISCIPLES OF THE DIVINE MASTER

60 Sunset Ave., Staten Island, NY 10314

Tel. (718) 494-8597 // (718) 761-2323

Website: WWW.PDDM.US

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