A Lectio Divina Approach to the Sunday and Weekday Liturgy

 

BREAKING THE BREAD OF THE WORD (Series 10, n.48)

WEEK 29 IN ORDINARY TIME: October 21-27, 2012 ***

 

(N.B. The pastoral tool BREAKING THE BREAD OF THE WORD: A LECTIO DIVINA APPROACH TO THE SUNDAY LITURGY includes a prayerful study of the Sunday liturgy of Year B from three perspectives. For reflections on the Sunday liturgy based on the Gospel reading, please scroll up to the “ARCHIVES” above and open Series 1. For reflections based on the Old Testament reading, open Series 4. For reflections based on the Second Reading, open Series 7. Please go to Series 10 for the back issues of the Weekday Lectio.

 

Below is a LECTIO DIVINA APPROACH TO THE SUNDAY - WEEKDAY LITURGY: October 21-27, 2012. The following reflections are based on the weekday liturgy’s Gospel reading.)

 

***

 

October 21, 2012: 29th SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME

WORLD MISSION SUNDAY  

“JESUS SAVIOR: He Came to Give His Life as Ransom for Many”       

 

BIBLE READINGS

Is 53:10-11 // Heb 4:14-16 // Mk 10:35-45

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

  

            In the October 2003 issue of Reader’s Digest is Lynn Rosellini’s remarkable story about a veteran skydiving instructor who sacrificed his life to save a student tumbling out of control in midair during a training session. If a student’s chute is not open by 2,000 feet, the U.S. Parachute Association requires instructors to release the student and deploy their own chutes. But Robert “Bobo” Bonadies held fast to Cindy Hyland, plummeting past the cutoff point. The heroic instructor, in making sure that she would be okay, would not have time to pull his own ripcord. Rossellini narrates: “Bobo Bonadies died on impact. He slammed into a pasture near the airport. His chute was in working order, FAA and police investigations later showed. But he hadn’t had sufficient time to deploy it. He was too busy saving Cindy Hyland’s life. In a wake that spanned six hours, more than 1,000 people waited to pay respects to Bobo in a line that stretched out the funeral home door and around the building … Bonadies’s real legacy is in the hearts of his family, friends and students. Bobo, they feel, taught them how to embrace life, not run from it.” 

           

This beautiful story of Bonadies’ self-sacrificing service gives us a glimpse of the utmost life-sacrifice extolled in this Sunday’s Gospel reading, about the Son of Man who did not come to be served but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many. Jesus affirms that there is no greatness, no ranking first, unless there is self-giving. Jesus’ affirmation: “For the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many” crystallizes the way of servitude that he lived as the Son-Servant of God. To give one’s life in loving obedience to the Father’s compassionate will is the key to glory. Those who bear the name of Christ are called to the same life offering and self-giving.

 

The outrage of the other ten disciples at the ambitious streak of James and John is understandable for it mirrors their own selfish absurd expectations. The Divine Master, patient as ever, responds by rectifying his disciples’ selfishness and covert tendency to engage in a power game. To be a Christian disciple is to take an uncompromising stance against false values such as “lording it over others”. To be first and the greatest according to Christian norms is to excel in service – in serving the needs of others. Jesus’ challenge presented in today’s Gospel is particularly relevant to anyone in a leadership position in the Church. It is a call to “servant leadership”. The Bible scholar Philip Van Linden remarks: “The church’s leaders are meant to be the first to drink the cup, daily serving the needs of their brothers and sisters, whatever those needs are, wherever they are perceived.”

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO 

 

Do we have an ambitious streak that prompts us to ask: “Teacher, we want you to do for us whatever we ask of you … Grant that in your glory we may sit one at your right and the other at your left”? Are we ready to respond to the Christian challenge: “Can you drink the cup that I drink or be baptized with the baptism with which I am baptized?”? In the light of Jesus’ affirmation, “For the Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many”, how do we live our Christian discipleship? 

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

(Adapted from the Intercessions, Liturgy of the Hours, Evening Prayer, Monday of Holy Week, and from Mk 10:45)

 

Redeemer of the world,

you did not come to be served but to serve

and to give your life as a ransom for many.

Grant us a greater share of your passion

through a deeper spirit of repentance,

so that we may share the glory of your resurrection.

In their trials,

enable your faithful people to share in your passion,

and so reveal in their lives your saving power.

You humbled yourself by being obedient even to accepting death,

death on the cross,

give all who serve you

the gifts of obedience and patient endurance.

You live and reign,

forever and ever.

Amen. 

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“The Son of Man did not come to be served but to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many.” (Mk 10:45)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO   

 

Pray for Church leaders that they may be truly animated by the spirit of Christ’s “servant leadership”. List the names of three persons you know who have given their lives in the service of others. Pray in thanksgiving for their self-sacrificing lives and ask them to intercede for you that you may imitate Christ’s servitude in God’s saving plan. 

 

 

***

 

October 22, 2012: MONDAY – WEEKDAY (29)

“JESUS SAVIOR: He Is the Essential One”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Eph 2:1-10 // Lk 12:13-21

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

            Disputes regarding family inheritance can be very bitter and destructive. A priest narrated to our Sisters an incident that he witnessed personally. He was called to assist a dying rich man. While he was praying over him and administering the last rites, the children were quarrelling in the kitchen over the inheritance. The priest was disappointed and frustrated.

 

This is probably the same feeling that Jesus has when someone in the crowd asks him: “Teacher, tell my brother to share the inheritance with me”. Jesus’ response to the request shows that he is a wise Teacher. Refusing to be dragged into the litigation, he denies any jurisdiction over the dividing of inheritances: “Friend, who appointed me as your judge and arbitrator?” Then he turns to the crowd, warning them about the trap of earthly possessions: “Take care to guard against all greed, for though one may be rich, one’s life does not consist of possessions”. As the Divine Master, he wants to show his disciples and would-be followers the true and efficacious way of dealing with earthly possessions. Jesus does this by narrating a parable about the hoarding Rich Fool. The latter is eagerly looking forward to a life of abundance and leisure, unaware that he is to die that very night.

           

            The final words of Jesus in the parable of the Rich Fool wield a cutting edge and a tone of judgment: “Thus will it be for all who store up treasure for themselves but are not rich in what matters to God” (Lk 12:21). The indictment against those who are obsessed with material possessions should make us focus on what is essential. Romano Guardini asserts: “Here is the sharp division between the essential and the non-essential … Eternal possessions or temporal possessions – which are essential? Naturally, the eternal ones, for the others fade away … The more deeply people realize that Christ is the essential, the less concerned they will be about everything else.”

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

How do I deal with material goods and temporal possessions? Is it obsessively, or with true freedom and wisdom? How do I respond to Christ’s indictment: “Thus will it be for all who store up treasure for themselves but are not rich in what matters to God”? Do I deeply realize that Christ is the essential? How does this realization affect my daily choices and actions? 

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Loving Father, source of all good,

you give to us the greatest gift - your Son Jesus,

the essential one and the ultimate good.

He is the Divine Master

who invites us to trust in your providence

and deal wisely with earthly possessions.

Fill us with concern for the poor, hungry and needy

so that we may share with them your blessings.

Do not allow greed to corrupt our priorities

and warp our responsibilities to our neighbor.

Let us listen to the voice of Jesus

who leads us to his paschal destiny and Easter glory.

He lives and reigns, forever and ever.

Amen.  

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“One’s life does not consist of possessions.” (Lk 12:15)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Thank the Lord for the blessings you have received from him. Then ask him to inspire you how to share the goods you have received from God with others.

 

 

***

 

October 23, 2012: TUESDAY – WEEKDAY (29); SAINT JOHN OF CAPISTRANO, priest

“JESUS SAVIOR: He Tells Us to Be Ready”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Eph 2:12-22 // Lk 12:35-38

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

Christian faith entails readiness and expectation of eternal glory. Jesus, the faith-filled person par excellence, invites us to deepen our faith and calls us anew to vigilant faith. The liturgical scholar Adrian Nocent remarks: “Each is called, during the night of faith, to stand ready for the final encounter unto which God calls. This invitation is most important. Everything else must take second place when it comes to having one’s lamp lit and trimmed, to being a faithful steward, to being always alert and watchful by the light of faith. That is the lesson of today’s celebration. The whole existence of the Church is a long, seemingly endless watch in which, century after century, she awaits her encounter with the Lord. She is ever alert and ready, confident as she is of the glory in store for her. Christ has promised that glory; more than that, he enables his Church to perceive the sign of it in the Eucharistic sacrifice.”

 

When my father was diagnosed with terminal cancer, I witnessed how he prepared for his final encounter with the Lord. Daily Communion and prayers were an important part of his preparation. A naturally compassionate man, he started to give his meager possessions as inheritance. I received a Hawaiian shirt, one hundred dollars in cash and two very small plastic statues of Santo Nińo and Saint Joseph, which I greatly treasure. Above all, I witnessed how he was able to let go of a grudge that lurked in his heart. He requested us to wear white at his funeral. The day before the Lord took him, he was crying: “Lord, please come and take me with you!” When the final hour came, he was ready to go with the Lord.

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Do we respond fully to Jesus’ call to vigilant faith? How do we prepare for the triumphant return of the Son of Man who comes unexpectedly?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Loving Father,

your Son Jesus Christ is our Savior.

By his obedient faith in your compassionate will

and by his paschal sacrifice on the cross,

he saved us all.

By his blood outpoured on the cross,

he made us people of the new covenant,

destined for eternal glory.

Help us to heed the call of Jesus

to live our faith in vigilance and readiness

for the advent of your kingdom of love, justice and peace.

Guide us to seek the things above.

Inform and deepen our faith by your living Word.

Make us your faithful servants,

now and forever.

Amen.  

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“Blessed are those servants whom the master finds vigilant on his arrival.” (Lk 12:37)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Pray that Christian disciples may learn to live in vigilant faith for the Lord’s coming. By our commitment to pursue justice, seek peace, protect human rights and give preferential concern to the poor and needy, let us allow our vigilant faith to make an impact on today’s fragmented society and prepare them for the definitive coming of the Lord’s kingdom at the end time. 

 

 

***

 

 

October 24, 2012: WEDNESDAY – SAINT ANTHONY MARY CLARET, bishop

 “JESUS SAVIOR: He Wants Us to Be Ever Ready and Faithful Servants”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Eph 3:2-12 // Lk 12:39-48

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

            Jesus exhorts us to be ever ready because his coming is as uncertain as the coming of a thief. Peter asks a question which Jesus ignores because it is impertinent. The lesson of Jesus’ parable is meant for all disciples, but especially for Church leaders who are called to greater accountability. They are to be punished in proportion to their irresponsibility. The leaders of the faith community are called to greater fidelity in fulfilling the mission Jesus entrusted to them. Jesus warns them: “Much will be required of a person entrusted with much … and still more will be demanded of the person entrusted with more.”

 

            My mother mirrors for me the quality of faithful vigilance. She was an elementary teacher for 38 years. No matter how tired or distressed she was, she would prepare the following day’s lesson plan. School supervisors would come unannounced to check. She did not want them to find her unprepared for that would be a big blot on her integrity as a teacher. But I suppose, even if there were no school supervisors, she would continue her good work just the same because of her loyalty to God and her sense of responsibility for the children entrusted to her care.

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

Do we heed Jesus’ exhortation to be vigilant and faithful? How?

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO 

 

Lord Jesus,

you teach us to be ever ready for your second coming.

You warn us that from those who have received much,

much more will be demanded.

Teach us to prepare for your coming

by our faithful service and personal dedication.

Help us to be persevering responsible servants

until you come again.

Amen. 

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

            “Much will be required of the person entrusted with much.” (Lk 12:48)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

When you are tempted to be lax in the responsibilities entrusted to you, remember the words of Jesus about faithful vigilance, and find in them inspiration for renewed commitment.

 

***

 

 October 25, 2012: THURSDAY –WEEKDAY (29)

“JESUS SAVIOR: He Creates Division”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Eph 3:14-21 // Lk 12:49-53

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

I was in my third year of high school when I came across Leo Tolstoy’s novel, “War and Peace”. It was irresistible. I did not go to school for three days to read it from cover to cover. I am fascinated by the Russian “prophet” Tolstoy. I appreciate his commitment to Christ’s teaching on love, compassion and non-violence. Conscience-stricken and upset by the plight of the poor, Count Tolstoy opted for a simplified life and dedicated more greatly his literary pursuits to socio-religious themes. His wife Sonya did not share his zeal for reform and for his new lifestyle that was simple and austere – for example, making himself a brew of barley and acorns because coffee was a luxury! She was chagrined that he chose to work on pugnacious tracts that put people off, when he could be producing wonderful novels that would bring in lots of money. Tolstoy did not care about money, but she had to, otherwise what would become of their children? Unable to bear any longer the divisive and oppressive situation at home and detesting the luxury found in his estate, Yasnaya Polyana, the 82-year old Tolstoy left home on November 10, 1910, accompanied only by his doctor. He fell ill on a southbound train and died at a stationmaster’s house on November 20, 1910. Leo Tolstoy is a fascinating figure – a modern day example of a prophet of contradiction.

 

Today’s Gospel presents the divisions that Jesus’ mission creates even in families. The way of Jesus catalyzes separations and provokes conflicts among those who had made a radical choice for him and those who had not. Aelred Rosser remarks: “The division Jesus speaks of with such force (listing several familial relationships for emphasis) is an inevitable consequence of well-lived faith. Into every life there comes a time when the choice to be truly Christian comes into conflict with another choice – perhaps a good choice. When that moment comes, we recognize the division Jesus brought into the world. The peace that comes from making the right choice is also something Jesus brought, but it is his peace, not the kind of peace the world gives.”

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Are we willing to embrace the detachment, renunciation and opposition that the peace of Christ may entail? Are we willing to be fully united with Christ and become, in him, a “sign of contradiction” in today’s world? 

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

You are the prophet of contradiction.

Grant us the grace to be faithful

when our radical choice for you creates division.

Help us to embrace the detachment and opposition

that our Christian commitment entails.

Let us experience the peace that you bring and

not the deceptive peace that the world offers.

You live and reign, forever and ever.

Amen.  

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“Do you think that I have come to establish peace on the earth? No, I tell you, but rather division.” (Lk 12:51) 

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

While avoiding facile compromises and easy tradeoffs, endeavor to bring the peace of Christ to a distressing situation that needs healing and reconciliation. Have the courage to be a “sign of contradiction” when the situation calls for it.

 

 

***

 

 October 26, 2012: FRIDAY – WEEKDAY (29)

“JESUS SAVIOR: He Exhorts Us to Read the Signs of the Times”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Eph 4:1-6 // Lk 12:54-59

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

            Jesus talks to the crowd. He is disappointed that they are able to read correctly the signs of the weather, but not the signs of God’s kingdom on earth in the person of Jesus. He exhorts the people to interpret correctly the “present time”, that is, the meaning of his mission. If only they were receptive, they should be able to perceive in the ministry of Jesus – in his words and deeds - that the kingdom of God has come. They should therefore respond to his call to conversion. The certainty of divine judgment should lead people to seek full reconciliation with God. Jesus warns them not to delay decision making for the kingdom. When God’s righteous judgment comes, they will wish that they had settled the issue before – just as a losing plaintiff wisely settles a legal case with a powerful opponent on the way to the magistrate and thus escapes punishment.

 

            As Christians in the modern world, we too are called to scrutinize the “signs of the times”. We are called to recognize and understand the distinctive characteristics, expectations, longings and needs of the people of today. We are called to be receptive to the signs of the kingdom value and the tasks it entails. The following story illustrates the receptive stance of a Christian disciple to the demands of the kingdom value (cf. Sarah Ball, “Stay-at-Home Help” in GUIDEPOSTS, October 2012, p. 19)

 

Earthquakes, tsunamis, tornadoes. They all played out before me on the evening news. I clicked off the TV. Every scene of people in need made me want to rush out to do something. But rushing out to do anything was impossible for me right now. I was recovering from surgery for breast cancer. With drainage tubes in my side, expanders in my chest, not to mention all the medications I took for the pain, I could barely move. What help could I be to people in trouble?

 

I can pray for them, I thought. And pray I did. I prayed for God to comfort those who were grieving, to heal the injured, to speed recovery. But I still felt helpless. “Please, Lord, isn’t there anything I can do myself?” I can’t even lift a gallon of milk these days, I thought. How can I help anyone? I couldn’t go anywhere. And although I’ve fostered animals in the past, even taking care of one displaced pet seemed beyond me.

 

The next day I got word of another disaster looming – the one close to my home in Iowa. Weathermen were predicting massive flooding in my area. There was a call out for volunteers. Workers were frantically piling sandbags against buildings and strengthening the levees. And here I was, stuck at home – not in danger, but still on the couch. The only way I could help would be if the Lord dropped something in my lap.

 

During a call to a friend I told her about my frustrations. “My friend Francis is really in a bind”, she said. “She lives on the flood plain and has decided to evacuate her mobile home, but she can’t afford a storage facility for her things. She’s scared she’ll come home and find all of her furniture destroyed. I can’t take any of it because my place is too small.”

 

“She can store it here!” I said. “Our basement is nearly empty; there’s plenty of room. It’s perfect!” Friends moved Francis’ furniture into my house the next day. It was the answer to her prayers – and mine.

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Do we make an effort to read the “signs of the times” and ask the Lord for the grace not just to perceive them, but to be able to respond to them? 

 

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Loving Jesus,

you exhort us to read the signs of your kingdom.

Your words and deeds manifest

that the kingdom of God is unfolding in our midst.

Give us the grace to be receptive to the “signs of the times”

and help us to carry out our duties

on behalf of the kingdom value.

You live and reign, forever and ever.

            Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

            The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the week. Please memorize it.

 

“Why do you not know how to interpret the present time?” (Lk 12:56) 

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Pray for the grace to scrutinize the “signs of the times”. In your own little way, respond positively to the demands they entail.

 

 

***

 

October 27, 2012: SATURDAY – WEEKDAY (29)

“JESUS SAVIOR: He Is the Ultimate Chance”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Eph 4:7-16 // Lk 13:1-9

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

            In an article by Jerry Davis in GUIDEPOSTS magazine (February 2004), he tells us about a remarkable journey that led him on the right path. He was kicked out of school repeatedly as a teenager. One sleepless, cold evening in February 1963, while living on charity at the Salvation Army in Kentucky, where he sought refuge, something clicked in his mind, as if everything had suddenly been put into focus for his 19-year-old eyes. Jerry narrated: “Somebody had to be looking out for me. Somebody who wouldn’t let me push him away no matter how hard I tried. In fact, the farther I ran from God, the closer he seemed to pull me. I slipped out of bed and knelt in a patch of moonlight. Lord, I prayed, the words finally coming. Thank you for your patience. Thank you for your love. I don’t know what’s good for me. Please, I need your guidance.” The runaway college dropout found work at a Kentucky hospital and enrolled at a nearby college. That was the beginning of a long road that led to graduate school and a Ph.D. Today he is the president of a college in Missouri – the College of the Ozarks. Indeed, Jerry Davis has given us a testimony of what it means to be given another chance and what it takes to respond to that chance. His was a beautiful story of a positive response to the patient mercy of God.

 

            Today’s reading underlines the Christian call to metanoia, which means conversion, repentance, and inner change, and encourages us with the reality of God’s patient mercy. In this account, Jesus calls for decision and conversion by referring to two contemporary disasters and by narrating the parable of the barren fig tree. Jesus dispels the popular belief that links disaster with punishment for sin. Indeed, in the present age, good fortune and disaster are not indications of a person’s spiritual state. In the judgment to come, however, the evil ones will experience the ultimate disaster - complete alienation from the life-love of God. Jesus dismisses the popular speculations regarding the personal culpability of the victims of the Galilean massacre and the Siloam accident by stressing the universal need for repentance. Unless all repent and respond positively to the Gospel, all will suffer the greater disaster of being alienated from God.

 

            The last section of the Gospel reading is Jesus’ parable of the barren fig tree which received a reprieve, or stay, from the impending punishment by the vineyard owner in response to the gardener’s compassionate plea: “Sir, leave it for this year also, and I shall cultivate the ground around it and fertilize it; it may bear fruit in the future. If not you can cut it down” (Lk 13:8-9). The biblical scholar, Samuel Oyin Abogunrin remarks: “The parable reminds us of the long-suffering of God but it also implicitly warns that those who persist in their sinful refusal to repent will suffer and eventually be cut down.”

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Do we respond to Christ’s call to conversion and apostolic fruitfulness? How do we react to the local and universal disasters that impinge upon our senses day after day through the mass media? What challenge does the parable of the barren fig tree give to us?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Father of mercy and goodness,

you revealed to us your patient mercy

by offering us the “ultimate chance”,

Jesus Christ, your beloved Son,

who loved us unto death on the cross.

He suffered for us

and irrigated the barren deserts of our hearts

with the blood of his sacrifice that we may bring forth a rich harvest

of love, holiness, truth, and healing.

Help us to welcome your forgiveness and love.

We are truly grateful

for giving us “one more chance” in Jesus,

who renews all things and transforms us.

He lives forever and ever.

Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

            “If you do not repent, you will all perish as they did.” (Lk 13:4)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Pray to the Lord for the gift of repentance and sincere conversion from sin, and for the gift of spiritual renewal. Pray for prisoners, especially those who have received the death penalty, and for all those who minister to their care. Do what you can do be a means of conversion for others.

 

 

***

 

 

Prepared by Sr. Mary Margaret Tapang  PDDM

 

 

PIAE DISCIPULAE DIVINI MAGISTRI

SISTER DISCIPLES OF THE DIVINE MASTER

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