A Lectio Divina Approach to the Sunday and Weekday Liturgy

 

BREAKING THE BREAD OF THE WORD (Series 10, n.29)

CORPUS CHRISTI & WEEK 10 IN ORDINARY TIME: June 10-16, 2012 **

 

(N.B. The pastoral tool BREAKING THE BREAD OF THE WORD: A LECTIO DIVINA APPROACH TO THE SUNDAY LITURGY includes a prayerful stud of the Sunday liturgy of Year B from three perspectives. For reflections on the Sunday liturgy based on the Gospel reading, please scroll up to the “ARCHIVES” above and open Series 1. For reflections based on the Old Testament reading, open Series 4. For reflections based on the Second Reading, open Series 7. Please go to Series 10 for the back issues of the Weekday Lectio.

 

Below is a LECTIO DIVINA APPROACH TO THE SUNDAY - WEEKDAY LITURGY: June 10-16, 2012. The following reflections are based on the weekday liturgy’s Gospel reading.)

 

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June 10, 2012: SUNDAY - THE MOST HOLY BODY AND BLOOD OF CHRIST (CORPUS CHRISTI)

“JESUS SAVIOR: He Gives Us His Body and Blood”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Ex 24:3-8 // Heb 9:11-15 // Mk 14:12-16,22-26

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

We celebrate with joy the solemn feast of the Body and Blood of Christ, sacramental sign of God’s great love and saving compassion. The Body of Christ broken for the world’s liberation from sin and his Blood poured out to make of us his covenant people are made present in the “here and now” through the power of the Holy Spirit in the Eucharist. In the Eucharist, we give thanks and praise to God the Father for the “real presence” of the Body and Blood of Christ. Through the Eucharist, the members of the Body of Christ, who share in the one loaf and one cup, join their lives and prayers, their sufferings and joys, their deeds and aspirations to Christ in his total surrender to the Father’s saving will. Indeed, in this beautiful feast of the Body and Blood of Jesus Christ, we are brought into the depths of Eucharistic faith. We are impelled by the charity and service it imposes upon us. Moreover, we are challenged to surrender ourselves completely to Jesus Christ, the eternal High Priest, who renews each day in the Eucharist his everlasting covenant of love with us - his chosen people.

 

To give us a glimpse into the intimate connection between priestly ministry and the Eucharist, here are episodes in the life of Damien De Veuster (cf. Hilde Eynikel, MOLOKAI: The Story of Father Damien, New York: Alba House, 1999, p. 169-170, 294). Saint Damien risked contagion, and indeed became a leper, as he served the afflicted flock of a Hawaiian leper colony in the nineteenth century. Like Jesus, the Eucharistic victim and eternal High Priest, the self-giving of the priest-victim Damien is complete.

 

CORPUS CHRISTI 1882: One of the ways in which social practice in the leper settlement differed from the world beyond was in the degree of co-operation and harmony among the different religious groups. The Corpus Christi procession of 1882 was an example of this. (…) Members of all the different creeds took part in preparing the festival and the feasting, and likewise participated in the processions and religious ceremonies. The procession was somewhat chaotic, with the various religious groups that participated joining in one another’s hymns and music, not always successfully. Damien and Montiton took turns to carry the holy sacrament, and they were careful to adjust the pace of the procession to take account of the invalids who found it difficult to walk. The whole event was a festival of respect for one another and Montiton expressed this when he said, in Hawaiian, “This celebration is unique. We Christians who are present here wish to demonstrate our belief in God, who is three in one. Today we worship Jesus Christ, our Eucharistic king, the Lord and Savior who is present in the Holy Sacrament. We worship his love for mankind and the Holy Sacrament that he instituted on the day before his death.”

 

 

***

 

 20 February 1889: Damien visited Kalaupapa for the last time. Mother Marianne wanted him to come into the parlor, but he refused, because he was unclean. That evening, he did not have the strength to climb into the buggy. He did not dare to knock on any of the parishioners’ doors to warm himself although he was very cold. He thought for a moment of asking Mollers for shelter, but the German priest was already so depressed and was not allowed to take in lepers. Evening came on. Lamps were lit in the windows and suddenly the wandering priest had an idea. He would just take a rest on the Sisters’ verandah and then he would have the strength to return to Kalawao. He lay down and dozed off. Sr. Leopoldina found him there the next morning. He awoke, looked astonished and then frightened and ashamed. “He is dying”, said a weeping Leopoldina over breakfast. “Death is in his look.” (…) Damien wrote, “I am trying slowly to complete my way of the cross and hope to reach Golgotha.”

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO 

 

How do we unite ourselves with the saving event of Christ’s ultimate saving sacrifice? What is our response to the tremendous gift of his Body and Blood? How do we translate into our daily lives the meaning of Christ’s sacrificial and covenant love?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Loving Father,

we thank you for the life-giving Body and Blood of your Son Jesus Christ,

the eternal High Priest and the mediator of the New Covenant.

Through his Eucharistic sacrifice on the cross,

he cleansed us of our sins

and brought us back to you as a reconciled people.

His body was “bread broken” for our healing and redemption.

His blood was shed as a “cup of sacrifice”.

By the blood outpoured in his passion and death on the cross,

he sealed the New Covenant

and we became your covenant people.

By your grace, we are privileged to share in your divine life.

In the sacrament of the Eucharist,

we proclaim this mystery of faith

and are brought deeper into its depths.

Help us to translate into our daily life

the covenant love that our communion in the Eucharistic meal signifies.

Give us the grace to incarnate

the self-giving of Jesus, our Eucharistic Master,

and his priestly ministry on the cross.

In celebrating the ultimate gift of the Body and Blood of Christ,

may we be “bread broken” and “wine poured out” for the life of the world.

We praise and thank you,

we adore you and serve you,

now and forever.

Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

            “This is my body … This is my blood of the covenant, which will be shed for many.” (Mk14:22,24)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO   

 

Pray that our priests may be deeply animated by the spirit of the Eucharist and be strengthened for their ministry on behalf of the poor and suffering. By your own acts of service and charity, strive to bring God’s covenant love to the people around you, especially the poor and the needy. 

 

 

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June 11, 2012: MONDAY – SAINT BARNABAS, apostle

“JESUS SAVIOR: He Calls Us to Live the Beatitudes”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Acts 11:21b-16; 13:1-3 // Mt 5:1-12

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

Today we hear anew the proclamation of the Beatitudes which are a “summary” of the meaning of Christian discipleship. In the Beatitudes, Jesus – the new Moses teaching on the new mountain of revelation - offers us the foundations of the law of the Kingdom. He shows us the path of Christian perfection. The Beatitudes are a description of Christ as well as a portrait of the ideal Christian. In order to experience fully God’s beatitudes, the Christian disciples are called to live intensely the life of Jesus, as one who is poor, lowly, merciful, single-hearted, peaceful, persecuted, sorrowful, hungry and thirsty for holiness.

 

Saint Barnabas illustrates what it means to live the Beatitudes. He sold a field he owned, brought the money and turned it over to the apostles to be shared with the community of believers. He unselfishly took Paul under his wing and, presenting him to the apostles, he testified to Paul’s bold work of evangelization in Damascus. Together with Paul, he was set apart and consecrated by the Holy Spirit for a special work of Gospel proclamation to the nations. He generously collaborated with Paul in their missionary journey. Saint Barnabas was martyred in Cyprus and is the patron of the island of his birth.

 

The following story likewise illustrates the spirit of the Beatitudes, but in a more modern setting (cf. Dale Galloway in Stories for the Heart, ed. Alice Gray, Sisters: Multnomah Publishers, Inc., 1996, p. 65).

 

Little Chad was a shy, quiet young fella. One day he came home and told his mother he’d like to make a valentine for everyone in his class. Her heart sank. She thought, “I wish he wouldn’t do that!” because she had watched the children when they walked home from school. Her Chad was always behind them. They laughed and hung on to each other and talked to each other. But Chad was never included. Nevertheless, she decided she would go along with her son. So she purchased the paper and glue and crayons. For three whole weeks, night after night, Chad painstakingly made thirty-five valentines.

 

Valentine’s Day dawned, and Chad was beside himself with excitement! He carefully stacked them up, put them in a bag, and bolted out the door. His mom decided to bake him his favorite cookies and serve them nice and warm with a cool glass of milk when he came home from school. She just knew he would be disappointed … maybe that would ease the pain a little. It hurt to think that he wouldn’t get many valentines – maybe none at all.

 

That afternoon she had the cookies and milk on the table. When she heard the children outside, she looked out the window. Sure enough here they came, laughing and having the best time. And, as always, there was Chad in the rear. He walked a little faster than usual. She fully expected him to burst into tears as soon as he got inside. His arms were empty, she noticed, and when the door opened she choked back the tears. “Mommy has some warm cookies and milk for you.” But he hardly heard her words. He just marched right on by, his face aglow, and all he could say was: “Not a one … not a one.” And then he added, “I didn’t forget a one, not a single one!”

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

What are our experiences of joy and difficulty in living out the Beatitudes? Among the Beatitudes mentioned in the Gospel of Matthew, which ones challenge us with greater intensity today?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Jesus poor,

help us to be poor in spirit

and to trust in your divine assistance and strength

that the kingdom of Heaven may be ours.

Jesus, man of sorrows,

help us to mourn and to surrender to the divine will

that our grief be transformed into joy and consolation.

Jesus, most gentle,

help us to be meek and humble

that peace may reign in our hearts and upon the earth.

Jesus, yearning for love,

help us to hunger and thirst for holiness

that we may satisfy our deepest longings.

 

O most merciful Jesus,

help us to be merciful

that we may relish your mercy and compassion.

Jesus, chaste and loving,

help us to be pure and single-hearted

that we may see God in the daily events of our life

and be admitted into his eternal Kingdom.

Jesus, our peace,

help us to be peacemakers

that we may build a world of harmony and beauty

and be called children of God.

Jesus Savior,

help us to welcome persecution for the sake of justice

that we may be rewarded greatly in heaven.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“Your reward will be great in heaven.” (cf. Mt 5:12)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Give thanks to the Lord for the gift of the Beatitudes in the Church. Choose a Beatitude as a moral-spiritual program and try to live this out in a more intense way this week.

 

***

 

June 12, 2012: TUESDAY – WEEKDAY (10)

“JESUS SAVIOR: He Calls Us to Be the Salt of the Earth and the Light of the World”

 

BIBLE READINGS

I Kgs 17:7-16 // Mt 5:13-16

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

Today’s Gospel reading presents the role of the disciples of Jesus using the images of salt and light. The biblical scholar, Daniel Harrington gives a concise, but insightful explanation: “In Jesus’ time, salt was used not only to improve the taste of food but also to preserve meat and fish. When Jesus compares his followers to salt, he says that they improve the quality of human existence and preserve it from destruction. In Jesus’ time, the only lamps available were small dish-like devices in which oil was burned. By our standards these lamps did not give off much light, but in the time before electricity their light must have seemed very bright. When Jesus calls his disciples the light of the world, he says that their actions serve as a beacon of light in a dark world. The disciples are challenged to let their light shine as a witness to their fidelity to Jesus and his heavenly Father.”

 

Against this backdrop, I find the article of Robert Rodriguez on the De Alba Family, the co-parishioners of our PDDM Sisters in Fresno, very interesting (cf. The Fresno Bee, Dec. 25, 2004, p. A11). Remembering its roots in the fields, the family has fed farmworkers in the central San Joaquin Valley for 11 years. It is their way of thanking them for their hard work in harvesting the region’s fruits and vegetables. It is also a reminder of how far this family of twelve has come from their own days of picking cherries, tomatoes and grapes in Valley fields and orchards. The De Alba Family also has held very successful canned food drives for the poor and strongly supports St. Mary Queen of Apostles Church, to which they belong. Rev. Pat McCormick, a former parish priest, testifies: “They have really been a unifying factor for the church. They are a great family.” Indeed, this wonderful De Alba family of Fresno is an inspiring example of what it means to be “the salt of the earth … the light of the world” in today’s world.

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

Are we “the salt of the earth … the light of the world”? Is the heavenly Father being glorified by our daily acts of Christian witnessing?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Lord Jesus,

you call us to be “the salt of the earth … the light of the world”.

Help us to treasure the beauty

of this wonderful vocation.

As “salt of the earth” and by the zest of our Christian witnessing,

we strive to uplift human dignity

and help our brothers and sisters relish the joy of salvation.

Let the light of your grace guide us.

Be with us as we share bread with the hungry,

shelter the homeless,

care for the needy,

defend the weak,

and comfort the sorrowing.

Moved by the Holy Spirit

to proclaim your saving love,

we wish to be “the light of the world … the city on the mountaintop”.

In sharing the glow of your compassion

through our works of charity and healing,

may God be given glory and praise.

We love you and adore you,

now and forever.

Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“You are the salt of the earth … You are the light of the world.”  (Mt 5:13a, 14a)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

By aiding the poor, the marginalized and the suffering members of the local and world community, strive to be “the salt of the earth … the light of the world”.

 

 

 

***

 

 

June 13, 2012: WEDNESDAY – SAINT ANTHONY OF PADUA, priest, doctor

“JESUS SAVIOR: He Calls Us to Fulfill the Law and the Prophets”

 

BIBLE READINGS

I Kgs 18:20-39 // Mt 5:17-19

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

(By Richard Noack, St. Christopher Parish, San Jose, CA-USA)

 

Sweating the Small Stuff in Faith

 

In his 1996 book, “Don’t Sweat the Small Stuff,” Psychologist Richard Carlson writes that we spend too much time, energy, and stress focused on minutiae.  The “small” stuff, suggests Carlson, will take care of itself if only we focus on the big stuff, such as our lives, relationships, and families.  But in today’s Gospel, Matthew 5:17-19, Jesus tells us that He has come as the fulfillment of the law and the prophets, not to abolish them.  Not only must we love God and follow Jesus, the “big” stuff from our Christian perspective, we must also abide by all of the law and prophets, to the smallest part of the smallest letter, careful not to break the least of these commandments.  When it comes to our faith, it seems, we must sweat the “big” stuff and the “small” stuff.

 

Over time, we Christians have gradually marginalized many of the strict Jewish laws in Deuteronomy, as well as those given by the prophets, as “small” stuff.  Some of those laws such as circumcision, dietary restrictions, and Sabbath observance, were viewed as anachronistic, often as an accommodation for the assimilation of non-Jewish converts.  But that legacy of not sweating the “small” stuff extends to the present day.  There are those in our communities who view some of our faith practices, disciplines, and doctrines as “small” stuff that need not be sweated, such as regular Sunday Mass attendance, appropriate and respectful attire while attending Mass, arriving on time for Mass and staying until the end of the closing hymn, participating in the Sacrament of Reconciliation, meatless Fridays during Lent, and respecting the sanctity of human life from conception to natural death. 

 

But these things aren’t “small” stuff.  They are a part of who we are as a faith community and they define us as the People of God.  As Catholic Christians, we consider our call to love God with our entire beings and to love our neighbors as ourselves to be our “big” stuff.  Our faith practices, disciplines, and doctrines are signposts that point the way to the “big” stuff and that sustain, strengthen, support, nourish, guide, prepare, and affirm us along the Way.

 

“Not all of us can do great things. But we can do small things with great love.”

~Blessed Mother Teresa of Calcutta

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Do I strive to act in accordance with the spirit of love that animates the law and the prophets? Do I value and carry out the “small” stuff that leads to the “big” stuff? Do I seek to understand the meaning of the divine law and try to fulfill the life-giving command of love of God and neighbor?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO 

 

Loving Father,

we thank you for your compassionate will to save us.

You form us into a covenant people

through the law and the prophets.

Let your spirit of love animate us.

Help us to transcend the letter of the law

and to act by the love of the Spirit.

Let us not degenerate

into false observance and heartless legalism.

As we strive to follow Christ faithfully,

help us to do small things with great love.

With Christ in the Spirit,

let us perceive the meaning of the law and the prophets

and fulfill it with love and devotion..

We bless and praise you;

we adore and serve you,

now and forever.

Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“I have come not to abolish but to fulfill.” (cf. Mt 5:17)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Pray for greater insight so that in the observance of civil and divine laws we may wisely perceive the spiritual force for good that animates them. Carry out your duties to God as well as the greater society, e.g. social service, paying taxes, etc. with personal dedication.

 

 

***

 

 

 June 14, 2012: THURSDAY - WEEKDAY (10)

“JESUS SAVIOR: He Calls Us to Manage our Anger”

 

BIBLE READINGS

I Kgs 18:41-46 // Mt 5:20-26

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

(By Bong Tiotuico, ASSOCIATION OF PAULINE COOPERATORS- Friends of the Divine Master, Antipolo Unit, Philippines)

 

Anger, Hatred and Reconciliation

 

According to the Jews at the time of Jesus, righteousness is equated to one's ability to follow the law. Scholars of scripture describe the attitude of Jesus regarding the law. He rejects erroneous interpretations of law while he holds firm to its original intent, i.e. the practice of a greater justice which is love. In this gospel, Jesus teaches a higher standard of adherence to the law that is more stringent than the "Thou shall not kill; whoever kills will be liable to judgment" commandment handed down through Moses. 

 

Jesus denounces murderous anger and hatred as immoral. From this, the Church teaches, if anger reaches a point of a deliberate desire to kill or seriously wound a neighbor, it is gravely against charity although it is also praiseworthy to impose forms of restitution to correct vices and maintain justice. Yes, there is such a thing called righteous anger when we face oppression, greed, corruption and other forms of injustice. But most people are not righteously angry: most of the time they are "sinfully" angry. We experience deliberate hatred toward other human beings because of wounded pride. We want to get even from a perceived hurt.

 

Husband: When I get mad at you, you never fight back. How do you control your anger?

Wife: I clean the toilet.

Husband: How does that help?

Wife: I use your toothbrush.

 

We always need to teach the usual suspects a lesson they will never forget. Like when you get seriously angry with that colleague who, due to a misunderstanding, starts spreading lies behind your back. And there were moments when you secretly wished that neighbor down the corner bad fortune because you were simply envious of his brand new red Porsche.

 

From human experience we learn that anger, like sin grows like a seed in our hearts, then becoming like a weed that chokes and displaces love, kindness, patience and other virtues, ultimately leaving no room for God. It is likewise compared to an acid which does more harm to the container in which it is stored than to anything on which it is poured. What is the antidote to these commonly occurring but overpowering feelings? Long before anger management therapy was invented, St. Paul (Eph. 4:31-34) advises, "Get rid of all bitterness, all passion and anger, harsh words, slander and malice of every kind. In place of these, be kind to one another; be compassionate and mutually forgiving, just as God has forgiven you in Christ." With our human weaknesses and limitations, how do we follow these prescriptions? With God's grace, nothing is impossible. We pray for patience, humility and for God to fill our hearts with love and forgiveness so we can better deal with that obnoxious next-door neighbor. In the same light, as they say in another part of the world: "If you are right, there is no need to be angry. If you are wrong, you have no right to be angry. Jesus tells us not only to reconcile with the subject of our anger but to do it without delay so that we can proceed to an authentic and perfect form of worship. Furthermore, to paraphrase St. James (Jas 1:19-20) "Let every person be quick to hear and listen, slow to speak, slow to anger like the heavenly Father, for anger does not fulfill God's justice."

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

What do I do to manage my anger and to seek healing for sinful attitudes that lead to violence and acted out anger?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Lord Jesus,

you lead us to a deeper interiorization of the law of love.

You wish us to manage our anger

which, if uncontrolled,

could lead to destruction, violence and death.

Heal us of sinful attitudes and unbridled emotions

that disturb our peace, harmony and dignity.

Give us the grace to pacify vengeful anger.

Let your Holy Spirit anoint the violent

with the balm of peace.

You live and reign forever and ever.

Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“Whoever is angry with his brother will be liable to judgment.” (Mt 5:21)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

By putting greater trust in Jesus, meek and humble of heart, strive to manage anger whenever it surfaces from your heart. Be a peacemaker to the people around you.

 

 

***

 

 June 15, 2012: THE MOST SACRED HEART OF JESUS

“JESUS SAVIOR: From His Pierced Side Flowed

Blood and Water”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Hos 11:1,3-4,8c-9 // Jn 19:31-37

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

(By Sol Tiotuico, ASSOCIATION OF PAULINE COOPERATORS- Friends of the Divine Master, Antipolo Unit, Philippines)

 

When we meditate on the Gospel of today’s feast of the Sacred Heart, we see a story of deliverance and penance, redemption and atonement, pardon and freedom, justification and sanctification, and cleansing and expiation. But the greatest story of all is the story of LOVE.

 

In the busyness of their preparation day, there was an urgency to bury the bodies of those dying on the crosses, before the evening when the Passover was to begin, so as not to contaminate the festivities. Pilate ordered that their legs be broken and they be taken down. When the soldier saw that Jesus was already dead, he pierced Jesus' side with a lance to make sure he was indeed dead.

 

The blood and water that flowed out of the pierced side of Jesus were prophetic signs of the two things that benefit us all: blood for atonement of our sins and water for our purification - to be worthy again of His love.

 

From our Redeemer on the cross flowed forth the great LOVE that caused Him to offer up His life for our everlasting and perfect salvation. This great LOVE should put to rest the doubts of some Christians, give them HOPE and inflame their FAITH in the just and forgiving Lord who, from His pierced side, flowed out WATER to cleanse our sins and BLOOD to expiate those very same sins. We are saved, we are sanctified, and we are loved!

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

How does the image of the “blood and water” flowing from the pierced side of Christ impinge on us? What is our personal response to the most Sacred Heart of Jesus and his burning love for us?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Prayer “Anima Christi” (by Pope John XXII, 1249-1334)

Soul of Christ, sanctify me.

Body of Christ, save me.

Blood of Christ, inebriate me.

Water from the side of Christ, wash me.

Passion of Christ, strengthen me.

O good Jesus, hear me.

Within your wounds, hide me.

Separated from you, let me never be.

From the evil one, protect me.

At the hour of my death, call me

and close to you bid me

that with your saints,

I may be praising you forever and ever.

Amen.

 

Prayer to the Sacred Heart (by Blessed James Alberione)

Jesus, Divine Master,

I thank and bless your most meek heart,

which led you to give your life for me.

Your blood, your wounds, the scourges, the thorns, the cross,

your bowed head tell my heart:

“No one loves more than he who gives his life for the loved one.”

The Shepherd died to give his life for the sheep.

I too want to spend my life for you.

Grant that you may always, everywhere, and in all things

dispose of me for your greater glory

and that I may always repeat:

“Your will be done.”

Inflame my heart with holy love for you and for souls.

Sacred Heart of Jesus, make me love you more and more.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

            The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the week. Please memorize it.

 

“One soldier thrust his lance into his side, and immediately blood and water flowed out.” (Jn 19:32) 

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

By your acts of mercy and compassion to the needy, suffering and grieving persons, let the love of the Sacred Heart console them and give them the strength of salvation.

 

 

***

 

June 16, 2012: SATURDAY – THE IMMACULATE HEART OF THE BLESSED VIRGIN MARY

“JESUS SAVIOR: A Sword Pierced His Mother’s Heart”

 

BIBLE READINGS

I Kgs 19:19-21 // Lk 2:41-51

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

When I was in India, I gained an insight into the “sword” that pierced Mary’s heart. I came into contact with the pain and anxiety of a parent who lost a child. The Italian lady, Sarah, and her adopted girl, Saraji, the six-year old daughter of a leper couple, were guests at our convent in Bangalore, India. One afternoon, they went downtown to shop. An hour later a very distraught Sarah came back. Saraji had wandered away and was lost. We prayed in earnest for her return. The deeply anxious Sarah, accompanied by some Sisters, searched for her. They found Saraji at the police station calmly eating an ice cream cone. Sarah was overjoyed to find her again.

 

            The first words of Jesus ever recorded in Luke’s Gospel are full of meaning. To his mother Mary’s legitimate reproach: “Son, why have you done this to us? Your father and I have been looking for you with great anxiety?”, the boy Jesus responds: “Why were you looking for me? Did you not know that I must be in my Father’s house?” With these astonishing words Jesus makes a pronouncement about the meaning of his life and mission. He declares that the heavenly Father’s will is his priority. His life and mission transcend the relationship of his human family. This episode confirms Simeon’s prophecy of a sword piercing Mary’s heart. The bible scholar Carrol Stuhlmueller reflects on this Gospel episode: “Mary finds Jesus at his work; he is not simply her son, but the heavenly Father’s Son, sent on a mission in which she finds him totally involved; at this she sorrows for it means separation.”

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Do we truly appreciate the vital role of Mary in salvation history? Do we treasure her immense love for Jesus and for us? Do we have devotion for the Immaculate Heart of Mary and imitate her loving compassion?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

A Prayer to the Blessed Mother (by Mother Teresa of Calcutta)

Mary, mother of Jesus, be a mother to each of us,

that we, like you, may be pure in heart,

that we, like you, love Jesus;

that we, like you, serve the poorest

for we are all poor.

First let us love our neighbors

and so fulfill God’s desire

that we become carriers of his love and compassion.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“His mother kept all these things in her heart.” (Lk 2:51)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

When you experience some trials and difficulties, present them to Mary and unite them with her most Immaculate Heart for the salvation of souls.

***

 

 

Prepared by Sr. Mary Margaret Tapang  PDDM

 

 

PIAE DISCIPULAE DIVINI MAGISTRI

SISTER DISCIPLES OF THE DIVINE MASTER

60 Sunset Ave., Staten Island, NY 10314

Tel. (718) 494-8597 // (718) 761-2323

Website: WWW.PDDM.US

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