A Lectio Divina Approach to the Sunday and Weekday Liturgy

 

BREAKING THE BREAD OF THE WORD (Series 10, n.25)

SIXTH WEEK OF EASTER: May 13-19, 2012 *****

 

(N.B. The pastoral tool BREAKING THE BREAD OF THE WORD: A LECTIO DIVINA APPROACH TO THE SUNDAY LITURGY includes a prayerful stud of the Sunday liturgy of Year B from three perspectives. For reflections on the Sunday liturgy based on the Gospel reading, please scroll up to the “ARCHIVES” above and open Series 1. For reflections based on the Old Testament reading, open Series 4. For reflections based on the Second Reading, open Series 7. Please go to Series 10 for the back issues of the Weekday Lectio.

 

Below is a LECTIO DIVINA APPROACH TO THE SUNDAY - WEEKDAY LITURGY: May 13-19, 2012. The following reflections are based on the weekday liturgy’s Gospel reading.)

 

***

 

May 13, 2012: SIXTH SUNDAY OF EASTER

“EASTER: A Time to Lay Down Our Life for Friends”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Acts 10:25-26,34-35,44-48 // I Jn 4:7-10 // Jn 15:9-17

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

“The Inn of the Sixth Happiness” is a 1958 movie based on the true story of Gladys Aylward, a modern day saint whose unquenchable passion to do good took her halfway around the world. Inspired by her dream to be a missionary, the English parlor maid, Gladys, journeyed to China and opened an inn for tired, hungry mule drivers crossing desolate mountain trails. Her greatest feat was achieved during the Japanese invasion of China when she led one hundred orphans to safety across enemy-held terrain. She was helped by a young man, Lee, an ex-convict and former teacher, who laid down his life in order to save the children. As Gladys and the children were crossing a forest, they chanced upon the enemy troops. Lee purposely presented himself as a decoy to lure the Japanese soldiers away from them. He was pursued and shot to death. Gladys and the children buried him with grief and devotion. The scripture text that Gladys used at the last rites for their heroic friend ended with the following words: “No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends” (Jn 15:13). This evocative text on true friendship is part of the Gospel reading that is proclaimed in today’s Sunday liturgy. 

            Today’s Gospel passage (Jn 15:9-17) fittingly serves as a catechesis on the great Easter event of our redemption by Jesus Christ. True love is sacrificial. The model of this ultimate self-giving love is Jesus, the Good Shepherd, who laid down his life for his sheep (cf. Jn 10:11). In this Easter season, we focus our attention on the great act of love that the Good Shepherd carried out for us by his saving sacrifice on the cross. He brought this sacrificial love to perfection by his rising to new life. The love of Jesus “for his own” provides the foundation for love among us - his disciples.

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO 

The Lord Jesus has revealed the depth of his love in laying down his life for us. Are we ready to make the same sacrifice? How do we carry out Christ’s command: “Love one another as I have loved you”?

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

(From a prayer composed by Blessed James Alberione) 

           

Jesus, Divine Master,

I thank and bless your most meek Heart,

which led you to give your life for me.

Your blood, your wounds, the scourges, the thorns, the cross,

your bowed head tell my heart:

“No one loves more than he who gives his life for the loved one.”

The shepherd died to give life to the sheep.

I too want to spend my life for you.

Grant that you may always, everywhere,

and in all things dispose of me for your greater glory

and that I may always repeat: “Your will be done.”

Inflame my heart with holy love for you and for souls.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

            “No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends.” (Jn 15:13)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO   

Offer a sacrificial act of loving service for God’s special “friends”: the poorest of the poor.

***

 

May 14, 2012: MONDAY – SAINT MATTHIAS, apostle

 “EASTER: A Time to Live as Friends-Slaves of Jesus”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Acts 1:15-17,20-26 // Jn 15:9-17

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

As Christian disciples, we nurture the Easter blessings we receive from God the Father. We are called to live a life of loving obedience to his saving will in imitation of Jesus, his Son-Servant. At the level of service, we are “slaves” since we follow the way of the Servant of Yahweh. Serving with love is deeply rewarding and exalting. At the level of intimacy, we are not “slaves” “because a slave does not know what his master is doing” (Jn 15:15), but “friends”. Our Lord Jesus Christ tells us: “I have called you friends, because I have told you everything I have heard from my Father” (Jn 15:15). 

The love of Christ moves us to love one another. The fact that God loves us into a new existence in Jesus and that we are no longer slaves but friends, empowers us to follow Christ’s command: “Love one another as I love you” (Jn 15: 12). Christian love, moreover, involves a mandate to go and bear lasting fruit. Attached to the life-giving vine, Jesus Christ, we are impelled to go to the ends of the earth, proclaim the Gospel and bear abiding fruits of conversion and faith.

Today we celebrate the feast of Saint Matthias. A witness of Christ’s public ministry and resurrection, he replaced Judas Iscariot as one of the twelve apostles. The eleven apostles felt unworthy to choose the “twelfth” of their own accord and prayed to God for guidance. The divine sign was revealed at the casting of lots. St. Matthias is privileged to be chosen by God to share in the apostolic mission of giving witness to Christ’s resurrection. In his personal relationship and service, St. Matthias is a friend-slave of Jesus. According to one tradition, he preached the Gospel in Jerusalem, Egypt and Ethophia and suffered martyrdom in Colchis (modern Georgia) at the hands of “meat eaters” or cannibals. Another tradition says he died by stoning in Jerusalem. Through his Gospel service and martyrdom, the apostle St. Matthias became totally configured to Christ, our Lord and Savior.

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

What is our relationship with Jesus Christ at the level of intimacy and at the level of service? Do we endeavor to go out and bear lasting fruits?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Jesus Divine Master,

you are the vine and we are branches.

We wish to remain in you and bear abundant fruits that last.

Thank you for revealing to us the great love of the Father

and for granting us the intimacy of a friend.

Thank you for the apostolic energy that impels us to love one another

and to proclaim your Gospel to the whole world.

Grant us the grace

to be always your loving friend and dutiful servant,

now and forever.

Amen. Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“I have called you friends.” (cf. Jn 15:15)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Carry out a task which you find distasteful in a spirit of love and service. Spend some quiet moments in church, preferably before the Blessed Sacrament, to deepen your spirit of listening and intimacy with the Divine Master.

 

 

***

 

May 15, 2012: TUESDAY – EASTER WEEKDAY (6) or SAINT ISIDORE

“EASTER: A Time to Be Receptive to the Spirit-Advocate”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Acts 16:22-34 // Jn 16:5-11

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

Parting can be heartbreaking. When I was eight years old, my parents decided to transfer the whole family from Guinobatan, a small peaceful town at the foot of picturesque Mount Mayon in Albay province, to Manila, a large chaotic city where my father was employed. When we were boarding the train, I caught a glimpse of my grandparents – standing together in silence – their venerable faces poignant with sadness. I will never forget the pained expression they wore. I wanted to run and embrace them. Tears welled up in my eyes and grief filled my young heart. My beloved grandparents tried to be strong. I knew I had to do just that.

 

In today’s Gospel, Jesus talks to his disciples of his imminent departure. Sadness and perplexity come upon them. But he assures them that his going away to the Father is beneficial: for unless he goes away the Advocate will not come to them. Jesus’ earthly departure is a gain. He will send from the bosom of the Father the Holy Spirit, his Easter gift. The Spirit of the Risen Lord Jesus is the Advocate-Judge who will prove the claims of Jesus as Son of God and condemn the world for their sin of unbelief. As an Easter people, we need to be receptive to the Spirit-Advocate who continues to witness to Jesus in today’s world. As we live the divine life shared to us by the death and resurrection of Christ, we testify in the Spirit that Jesus Christ is the righteous one. He triumphs over Satan and is victorious over sin and death.

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

Do I experience painful but beneficial departure? Do I open my heart to the presence of the Spirit-Advocate who testifies to the world about Jesus, the Risen Lord and the Son of God?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

O Risen Lord,

you send to us the Spirit-Advocate, the Easter gift.

He vindicates your claim that you are the Son of God.

O Jesus Savior,

help us to welcome the Spirit-Advocate in our life

and be attentive to his inspiration.

By the power of the Holy Spirit at work in us,

let us witness to the divine life received

through your paschal sacrifice.

We adore you and love you, now and forever.

Amen. Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“But if I go, I will send the Advocate to you.” (cf. Jn 16:7)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Recall some significant “departure” moments in your life and see how they have contributed to strengthen your character. By the power of the Advocate-Spirit, be ready to give a witness to Jesus in the midst of today’s troubled world.

 

 

***

 

 

May 16, 2012: WEDNESDAY – EASTER WEEKDAY (6)

“EASTER: A Time to Be Receptive to the Spirit-Truth”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Acts 17:15,22-18:1 // Jn 16:12-15

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

The following story entitled “Half Truths” is humorous, but it can give us an idea of the importance of Jesus’ promise to his disciples concerning the Spirit of truth who would guide us to the fullness of truth.

 

The first mate had somehow gotten drunk, so that night the captain wrote into the record for the day, “Mate drunk today.” The mate begged the captain to take it out of the record, for it might cost him his job with the ship’s owners. It was also his first offense. But the captain refused saying, “It’s a fact and into the log it goes.” Some days later the mate was on the bridge and it was his turn to keep the log. He duly recorded the location, speed, and distance covered that day. Then he added, “The Captain, sober today.” The captain protested that this would leave an altogether false impression – that it was an unusual thing for him to be sober. But the mate answered in the very words of the captain, “It’s a fact and so into the log it goes.”

 

 

A thing may be true, but the time and manner of telling and the circumstances may give an entirely false impression of another’s action or character. Many of us are languishing in situations of incomplete truth or are suffering the painful consequences of half-truths. Indeed, many lack complete understanding. Our contact with Jesus Truth-Way-Life, the glorified Lord and Redeemer, inspires us to seek the fullness of truth and nurtures in us a faith seeking understanding.

 

Today’s Gospel reading underlines the life-giving promise of Jesus about the coming of the Spirit of truth who will guide his disciples to all truth. The role of the Holy Spirit in our life is to make the mission and message of Jesus clear in every age. The revelation of God’s saving love by Jesus’ life, death and resurrection is complete, but our understanding is incomplete. We need the guidance and the memory of the Holy Spirit to enable us to grasp, understand and accept the import, the personal implication and the challenge of Christ’s paschal destiny as a suffering and glorified Lord. Through the guidance of the Spirit of truth, we become more united with the Paschal Mystery of the incarnate Truth, Jesus Christ.

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

What is the role of the Holy Spirit in my life? Do I welcome him as the Spirit of the Father and the Son who will lead me to the fullness of truth? How do I respond to the guidance of the Holy Spirit leading me to a deeper understanding and fuller participation in the paschal destiny of Jesus Christ, the beloved Son-Servant of God? Is my personal life immersed in “the truth” of God’s love, revealed by his Son in the Holy Spirit?

 

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO 

 

O Risen Christ,

you are gloriously robed in light.

Let your Spirit of truth come

to dispel our doubts and lack of understanding.

Guide us into the fullness of truth.

We need the Holy Spirit to bring the memory and the presence

of your paschal sacrifice into our lives.

Through the Spirit-Truth,

give us a more intimate participation in your glorious destiny

and grant us eternal light.

You are wrapped in pure light

and we praise you, now and forever.

Amen. Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia!

 

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“But when he comes, the Spirit of truth, he will guide you to all truth.” (cf. Jn 16:13)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Offer a special prayer and sacrifice for the mass media and the digital communications that they may be used to promote the truth and not to distort the truth.

 

 

***

 

 

 May 17, 2012: THURSDAY – EASTER WEEKDAY (6)

“EASTER: A Time to Turn Our Grief into Joy”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Acts 18:1-8 // Jn 16:16-20

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

Jesus talks to his disciples about sadness and gladness. He prepares them for his impending death and the grief that they will experience in a “little while”. But their grief will give place to the joy of resurrection. His impending passion will plunge his disciples into great sorrow, but his victory over death will, in a “little while”, turn their grief into joy. As Christian disciples we continually experience desolation and consolation, trial and triumph, sadness and gladness, death and resurrection. They form the warp and the woof of our daily life. Through these complementary experiences, we develop a spiritual “insight” that enables us to see the presence of God even in the midst of difficulties. They help us grow in faith and trust as we pursue the divine through various crises and adversities. Indeed, life in the Risen Christ enables us to savor a joy that is deeply profound and enduring.

 

The following story circulated through the Internet gives us a glimpse into the joy that results from being totally united with God’s life-giving will.

 

Pam has known the pain of considering abortion. More than 24 years ago, she and her husband Bob were serving as missionaries to the Philippines and praying for a fifth child. Pam contracted amoebic dysentery, an infection of the intestine cause by a parasite found in contaminated food or drink. She went into a coma and was treated with strong antibiotics before they discovered she was pregnant.

 

Doctors urged her to abort the baby for her own safety and told her that the medicines had caused irreversible damage to her baby. She refused the abortion and cited her Christian faith as the reason for her hope that her son would be born without the devastating disabilities physicians predicted. Pam said the doctors didn’t think of it as life; they thought of it as a mass of fetal tissue.

 

While pregnant, Pam nearly lost their baby four times but refused to consider abortion. She recalled making a pledge to God with her husband: if you will give us a son, we’ll name him Timothy and we’ll make him a preacher.

 

Pam ultimately spent the last two months of her pregnancy in bed and eventually gave birth to a healthy baby boy on August 14, 1987. Pam’s youngest son is indeed a preacher. He preaches in prison, makes hospital visits, and serves with his father’s ministry in the Philippines. He also plays football. Pam’s son is Tim Tebow.

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Do we believe that if we open ourselves to the Easter event we will experience our trials and sadness being transformed into triumphs and joy?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Jesus Lord,

you experienced the depths of human sorrow

in your passion and death

and the fullness of joy

in your glorious resurrection.

You promised that our grief will be turned into joy

in a “little while”.

Help us to trust in you

and endure the “little while” trials of daily life.

Let us look forward to the eternal joy in heaven.

Make us people of hope.

As Easter people in today’s fragmented world,

make us messengers of Good News and channels of joy

for the heartbroken and the grieving.

We love you and give you praise,

now and forever.

Amen. Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“You grief will become joy.” (Jn 16:20)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Through prayer, word and action, be present to a grieving and/or troubled person and assure him/her that his/her sorrow will be turned into joy.

 

 

***

 

 May 18, 2012: FRIDAY – EASTER WEEKDAY (6) or SAINT JOHN I, pope, martyr

“EASTER: A Time to Experience Birth Pangs and Joy”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Acts 18:9-18 // Jn 16:20-23a

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

Jesus uses the image of a woman in labor to describe the birthing of the kingdom of God. A laboring woman is in pain but there is tenderness and joy at the birth of her child. The “birth pangs” symbolize the suffering and trials of the disciples as they participate in his passion and death as Savior of the world. There will be sadness and pain, but these will be replaced by tremendous joy at the Lord’s resurrection. The Good News of the Risen Lord will enable them to situate trials and adversities in a new perspective. The “birth pangs” are part of the paschal process that leads to new life and eternal joy. In Jesus Lord, the font of joy, gladness has the ultimate word. Easter is a call to rejoice in the Risen Lord and to be missionaries of joy to a tormented world.

 

The following account of a woman in labor gives us a glimpse into the difficult birthing of the kingdom of salvation (cf. Karen Valentin in DAILY GUIDEPOSTS 2010, p. 44).

 

Everything I’d read about labor and delivery promised ninety seconds of contractions maximum, with three to four minutes of relief in between. I can handle that, I thought. But the books lied, or else I missed the chapter about labor-inducing drugs that sent an army of tortures into my body every other minute for twenty hours! I was in shock from the intensity of the pain, and by the time I gave birth I was completely exhausted.

 

Perhaps I was still in a delivery-room fog, but the tiny baby now wrapped like a burrito and surrounded by family didn’t quite feel like mine. “Do you feel like a parent yet”, I asked my husband, hoping I wasn’t the only one. Apparently I was.

 

Hours later, alone with the sleeping infant parked near my bed, everything still felt surreal. The baby was quiet and still like a doll, and had been asleep for hours. I needed sleep, too, but my body still hurt. I couldn’t get comfortable, and every movement – no matter how small – was torture.

 

Finally I drifted off, but just as my dream began, the little burrito woke me up. His loud, urgent cry penetrated deep inside me to a place I’d never known. It made me sit up, gritting through the pain as I inched toward my son. I picked him up and cradled him close to my body, and to our mutual relief the crying stopped. And during that peaceful moment, as I fed my little boy, I finally felt like a mother.

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Are we willing to experience the birth pangs of the coming of the kingdom of salvation? Are we willing to embrace the joy in the Risen Lord and the mission that it entails?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Jesus Lord,

you want us to experience the birth pangs

of your kingdom

and to share in your victory over sin and death.

Let us participate in your passion

that we may relish the joy of salvation.

When birth pangs are intense and overwhelming,

give us the strength to look forward

to the joy that lies ahead.

Teach us to trust in the Easter joy

that dispels the anguish of despair.

O Risen Lord,

you are the source of eternal gladness,

now and forever.

Amen. Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

            The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the week. Please memorize it.

 

“Your hearts will rejoice.” (Jn 16:22)

 

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Alleviate the suffering and anxiety of a person close to you and enable that person to experience that the joy of the Lord has the ultimate word.

 

 

***

 

May 19, 2012: SATURDAY – EASTER WEEKDAY (6)

“EASTER: A Time to Trust in the Power of Prayer”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Acts 18:23-28 // Jn 16:23b-28

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

Jesus tells his disciples that those who love him will be loved by his heavenly Father. Those who believe in him as the Son of God will share in the joy of his glory as the Risen Lord. They will likewise enter into a new and intimate relationship with God the Father in prayer. At the birth of his kingdom and in his victory over sin and death, they will efficaciously pray and intercede. Jesus exhorts his disciples to ask the Father anything in his name. This will be given to them and their joy will be complete. Easter is a time to trust in the power of prayer. Easter invites us not only to rejoice in the Lord, but also to intercede in his name.

 

The following story gives witness to the power of prayer (cf. Susan Orneck, “Air Lift” in GUIDEPOSTS, May 2012, p.65).

 

San Diego to Tampa – a long flight. I was on my way home from a real-estate agent workshop. If only I could relax, I thought as I shifted in my seat. Even a lucky upgrade to first class wasn’t enough to calm me down. My nephew had been diagnosed with melanoma. Jordan was in his early twenties, just starting a career as a songwriter. He faced his disease with incredible courage, believing in God’s plans for his life, whatever they were. Lord, I am so worried about him, I thought.

 

I noticed the man sitting next to me – long hair, ratty T-shirt, headphones and tattoos. He looked like a rocker dude from the seventies. “I’m traveling with my band”, he confirmed as the flight attendant served us a beverage. “Really? My nephew wants to be a songwriter.” He pulled off his headphones and asked me more about Jordan. I talked about his cancer, how much I feared losing him. Usually I was good at keeping my feelings in check. But here, with a complete stranger, I suddenly felt free to share how anxious I was. “I see him fighting so hard”, I said, starting to cry. “Chemotherapy is so difficult. I don’t know where he finds the strength to bear it.”

 

“I had cancer myself a few years ago”, my seatmate said after a moment. “I know how hard it can be.” A tear streaked down his cheek. He grabbed my hand and held it tight. “You can pray for your nephew’, he said. “I’ll pray with you.” A woman spoke up from across the aisle. “I’d like to pray for him too.” “Me too”, said the man behind me. I hadn’t known everyone was listening!

 

The next thing I knew our entire cabin was on its feet and holding hands – including the two flight attendants. I didn’t know anything about leading a prayer circle so I just spoke from the heart about Jordan. For the first time since his diagnosis I didn’t feel so alone in my fear. God was with me 30,000 feet above the earth, and so were these people who were praying – and would continue to pray – for my nephew.

 

Jordan’s cancer went into remission. He is still writing songs. And I am still lifted up by what I learned about the power of prayer.

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Do we trust in the power of prayer? Do we believe that whatever we ask the Father in the name of Jesus will be given us?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Jesus Savior,

you assure us of the power of prayer.

You tell us that whatever we ask the Father in your name

will be given to us.

We turn to you in humble supplication.

Prompted by the Holy Spirit

we pray that the heavenly kingdom may come

and his saving will be done.

Give us the grace to know you,

serve you

and love you more and more.

We treasure the Father’s love for you and for us.

We desire to serve you,

now and forever.

Amen. Alleluia, alleluia, alleluia.

 

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“Whatever you ask the Father in my name he will give you.” (Jn 16:23b)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

Make a serious effort to offer a prayer of intercession on behalf of the people of today, especially those being led astray by false teachings and erroneous moral principles.

 

 

***

 

 

Prepared by Sr. Mary Margaret Tapang  PDDM

 

 

PIAE DISCIPULAE DIVINI MAGISTRI

SISTER DISCIPLES OF THE DIVINE MASTER

60 Sunset Ave., Staten Island, NY 10314

Tel. (718) 494-8597 // (718) 761-2323

Website: WWW.PDDM.US

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