A Lectio Divina Approach to the Sunday and Weekday Liturgy

 

BREAKING THE BREAD OF THE WORD (Series 10, n.14)

FIRST WEEK OF LENT: February 26 - March 3, 2012****

 

(N.B. The pastoral tool BREAKING THE BREAD OF THE WORD: A LECTIO DIVINA APPROACH TO THE SUNDAY LITURGY includes a prayerful study of the Sunday liturgy of Year B from three perspectives. For reflections on the Sunday liturgy based on the Gospel reading, please scroll up to the “ARCHIVES” above and open Series 1. For reflections based on the Old Testament reading, open Series 4. For reflections based on the Second Reading, open Series 7. Please go to Series 10 for the back issues of the Weekday Lectio.)

 

Series 10 presents A LECTIO DIVINA APPROACH TO THE SUNDAY - WEEKDAY LITURGY: February 26 – March 3, 2012. The following reflections are based on the weekday liturgy’s Gospel reading.)

 

***

 

February 26, 2012: FIRST SUNDAY OF LENT

 “LENT: A Time to Be Faithful”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Gn 9:8-15 // I Pt 3:18-22 // Mk 1:12-15

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

I cannot forget a “Dear Abby” letter I read in the newspaper, Staten Island Sunday Advance, dated January 26, 2003. The letter came from a married woman who cheated on her husband “because it seemed exciting.” When the husband learned about the affair, he became depressed and moved out. He said he “couldn’t do it anymore,” he couldn’t respect her, couldn’t love her, and couldn’t get certain images out of his head. She apologized and begged him to come back, but he was cold as ice. Abby wrote to her: “I’m sorry, but there are no magic words that can turn back the clock. The only magic I can see is that in your hunger for excitement, you made your marriage disappear in a puff of smoke. I hope your sad story serves as a cautionary example to others who are contemplating an affair. There is no such thing as free love. What you’re paying now is the amusement tax.” 

Indeed, there are so many sad stories of infidelity. As we embark on our Lenten spiritual journey, let us focus our attention on Jesus, the model of covenant fidelity, that we may have strength to overcome temptations and be faithful. To the Father who declared at the River Jordan that Jesus is his beloved Son, Jesus proved his son-ship by accepting unreservedly his vocation-mission as Servant-Messiah. The entire life of Jesus, especially his perfect servitude on the cross, confirms his baptismal consecration. During the Lenten season, the Church rightly presents Jesus as the faithful one.

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

In this Lenten season of grace, do we focus our eyes on Christ’s covenant fidelity to the Father? 

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

O loving and merciful Father, in the baptism at the Jordan, in the heroic strength Jesus showed against the temptation in the wilderness, and in the utmost service of love he offered on the cross, you gave us a beautiful example of commitment. In Jesus, your Servant-Son, you renew your covenant with us, especially when our moral fibers are weakening. Grant us a listening heart that we may receive your Word with faith. Make us a sign of faithfulness in a broken world that yearns for integrity and wholeness. You live and reign forever and ever. 

 

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“Jesus was tempted by Satan.” (cf. Mk 1:12)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO   

 

Carry out the Lenten fast, not only with regard to food, but also with the right use of the means of social communication. Reach out to the poor and hungry by contributing the fruit of your fasting to a charitable organization.

 

 

***

 

February 20, 2012 (Monday): LENTEN WEEKDAY (1)

 “LENT: A Time for Almsgiving”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Lv 19:1-2,11-18 // Mk 25:31-45

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

Today’s weekday liturgy helps us to focus on almsgiving or “works of mercy” as a necessary Lenten practice. We will be judged on what we have done or failed to do for those who were hungry and thirsty, strangers, naked, sick, prisoners, those who, from the beginning of his ministry, Jesus declared blessed (Mt 5:1-12). Just as Jesus has identified himself with the needy, he likewise identifies himself with those who exercise works of mercy on their behalf. He recognizes as his own those who treat his “little ones” with compassion, the badge of belonging to the heavenly kingdom.

 

Lent is a privileged time to delve into the presence of Christ in the poor and vulnerable and our fraternal duty to care for them. Mother Teresa of Calcutta said, “If sometimes our poor people have had to die of starvation, it is not because God didn’t care for them, but because you and I didn’t give, were not instruments of love in the hands of God, to give them that bread, to give them that clothing; because we did not recognize Christ, when once more Christ came in distressing disguise.”

 

The works of mercy that are done as an exercise of love can be interpreted literally. But it must also be carried out creatively and with sensitivity to the “here and now” situations. The whole world has more than its share of the homeless and the hungry. We need to go beyond what is obvious. Indeed, there are thousands of ways to be of help and many more inspired efforts of personal giving.

 

The following article shows how to carry out creatively and sensitively the Lenten practice of almsgiving (cf. Jeanne Hunt, “Cleaning our Spiritual Closets” in ST. ANTHONY MESSENGER, February 12, 2012, p. 40).

 

6 Ways to Promote Selfless Giving

1. Volunteer at a nursing home. Take children with you and perhaps even the family pet. Many elderly people are lonely and love company.

2. Make a list of 40 people who would love to hear the sound of your voice. Call them, one person a day, and tell them that you love them.

3. Watch someone’s children so that he or she can have a break.

 4. Give 15 percent of your weekly salary to a family that has no income.

 5. Gather a group of friends and volunteer to do house repairs for single parents, elderly people or anyone in your parish who needs help.

6. Each day of Lent, practice a random act of compassion: Help someone to his or her car with groceries, give up lunch and give the money to a needy friend, clean up a mess that you did not make.

 

Service turns us into the hands and heart of Jesus Christ. By turning from self and serving others, we are becoming Christ’s living, breathing presence. This is what St. Augustine meant when he preached, “Become what you have eaten” (the Eucharist).

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

Do we make an effort to exercise the Lenten practice of almsgiving more meaningfully and creatively?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Lord Jesus, we thank you for the gift of Lent. This season of grace forms us in the ways of charity and teaches us the fraternal duty of almsgiving. Make us sensitive to the needs of our brothers and sisters. Help us to respond creatively with selfless giving. Let our works of mercy radiate in today’s troubled world your compassion, the badge of nobility in your kingdom.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“Whatever you did for one of these least brothers of mine, you did for me.” (cf. Mt 25:40)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Resolve to do a work of mercy each day, especially during the season of Lent, and ask the Lord for the grace to carry it out.

 

 

***

 

February 28, 2012 (Tuesday): LENTEN WEEKDAY (1)

“LENT: A Time to Live the Lord’s Prayer”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Is 55:10-11 // Mt 6:7-15

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

We have memorized the Lord’s Prayer, but many times we pray it by rote. The season of Lent is a privileged time to delve into the meaning of the Lord’s Prayer and translate it into our daily life. Jesus teaches us that prayer is total surrender to his saving will. Saint Thomas Aquinas remarks: “The Lord’s Prayer is the most perfect of prayers … In it we ask, not only for all the things we can rightly desire, but also in the sequence that they should be desired. This prayer not only teaches us to ask for things, but also in what order we should desire them.” The first things we desire and pray for are divine glorification, i.e. the sanctification of the Father’s name, the coming of his kingdom and the accomplishment of his divine will. Only then could our petitions focus on human needs.

 

The Lord’s Prayer invites us to put absolute trust in the Father. The filial stance proposed by this model helps us to be ready, vigilant and more attuned to the divine will. To pray the “Our Father” is an exercise in self-surrender. It leads to spiritual maturity. The following “Cherokee Legend” gives insight into the complete trust and total vulnerability that the Lord’s Prayer requires in order to grow in faith.

 

Do you know the legend of the Cherokee Indian youths’ rite of passage? His father takes him into the forest, blindfolds him and leaves him alone. He is required to sit on a stump the whole night and not remove the blindfold until the rays of the morning sun shine through it. He cannot cry out for help to anyone.

 

Once he survives the night, he is a man. He cannot tell the other boys of his experience, because each lad must come into manhood on his own. The boy is naturally terrified. He can hear all kinds of noises. Wild beasts must surely be all around him. Maybe even some human might do him harm. The wind blew the grasses and earth, and shook his stump, but he sat stoically, never removing the blindfold. It would be the only way he could become a man!

 

Finally, after a horrific night the sun appeared and he removed his blindfold. It was then that he discovered his father sitting on the stump next to him. He had been at watch the entire night, protecting his son from harm.

 

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Are we able to pray the Lord’s Prayer and mean what it says, especially the self-surrender?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Our Father, who art in heaven,

hallowed be thy name; thy kingdom come;

thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven.

Give us this day our daily bread

and forgive us our trespasses

as we forgive those who trespass against us;

and lead us not into temptation,

but deliver us from evil.

Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“This is how you are to pray …” (cf. Mt 6:9)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Unite the daily trials and difficulties you experience with the Lord’s Prayer and make them an occasion for self-surrender and spiritual growth.

 

 

***

 

February 29, 2012 (Wednesday): LENTEN WEEKDAY (1)

“LENT: A Time to Perceive the Sign”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Jon 3:1-10 // Lk 11:29-32

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

In light of the Lords’ Prayer in which Jesus taught his disciples to pray for the advent of God’s kingdom, the demand of the unbelieving crowd for a “sign” is ironic, devious and out of place. They were asking for an awesome “sign” to confirm that Jesus’ power was coming from God. But no amount of miraculous signs could shed light on an unbelieving heart. The evil generation could not perceive that Jesus himself is the sign par excellence of the power of God. Like Jonah, the person of Jesus is a sign and means of salvation, though Jesus is a much greater sign than Jonah.

 

The season of Lent is a propitious time to delve into Jesus, the good news of salvation. He calls us to interior conversion and a radical turning away from sin. He destines us for a wondrous transformation through the way of the cross. He desires us to share in his Easter glory. Lent is a time to be more open to grace. The sacred time and space of Lent make us more sensitive and receptive to the wondrous sign of saving love, our Lord Jesus Christ.

 

The following charming story gives us a glimpse of the positive transforming effect of the Messiah “sign” (cf. Anthony De Mello, Taking Flight: A Book of Story Meditations, Image Books/Doubleday: New York, 1988, p. 51-52).

 

The Guru meditating in his Himalayan cave opened his eyes to discover an unexpected visitor sitting there before him – the abbot of a well-known monastery. “What is it you seek?” asked the Guru.

 

The abbot recounted a tale of woe. At one time his monastery had been famous throughout the western world. Its cells were filled with young aspirants and its church resounded to the chant of its monks. But hard times had come on the monastery. People no longer flocked there to nourish their spirits, the stream of young aspirants had dried up, the church was silent. There was only a handful of monks left and these went about their duties with heavy hearts.

 

Now this is what the abbot wanted to know. “Is it because of some sin of ours that the monastery has been reduced to this state?” “Yes”, said the Guru, “a sin of ignorance.” And what sin might that be?” “One of your numbers is the Messiah in disguise and you are ignorant of this.” Having said that the Guru closed his eyes and returned to his meditation.

 

Throughout the arduous journey back to his monastery the abbot’s heart beat fast at the thought that the Messiah – the Messiah himself – had returned to earth and was right there in the monastery. How was it he had failed to recognize him? And who could it be? Brother Cook? Brother Sacristan? Brother Treasurer? Brother Prior? No, not he; he had too many defects, alas. But then, the Guru had said he was in disguise. Could those defects be one of his disguises? Come to think of it, everyone in the monastery had defects. And one of them had to be the Messiah!

 

Back in the monastery he assembled the monks and told them of what he had discovered. They looked at one another in disbelief. The Messiah? Here? Incredible! But he was supposed to be here in disguise. So, maybe. What if it were so-and-so? Or the other one over there? Or …

 

One thing was certain. If the Messiah was there in disguise, it was not likely that they would recognize him. So they took to treating everyone with respect and consideration. “You never know”, they said to themselves when they dealt with one another, “maybe this is the one.”

 

The result of this was that the atmosphere in the monastery became vibrant with joy. Soon dozens of aspirants were seeking admission to the Order – and once again the church echoed with the holy and joyful chant of monks who were aglow with the spirit of love.

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

Do I make a real effort to be sensitive, read and perceive the manifold Messiah “sign” around us? Do I welcome his saving presence in my life?

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO 

Lord Jesus, you are the saving sign that surpasses Jonah. You call us to conversion and offer us the Gospel of salvation. Your death on the cross is a great sacrament of salvation. Lead us to Easter glory. By our lives transformed, make us limpid signs that point to you. Give us the grace to help people love and serve you. We welcome you and the heavenly kingdom you bring. We love you, Jesus! We wish to serve you, now and forever. Amen.

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“Just as Jonah became a sign to the Ninevites, so will the Son of Man be to this generation.” (cf. Lk 11:30)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

By your kindness and thoughtfulness to the people around you, enable them to perceive the Messiah “sign” that fills our world with hope.

 

 

***

 

 March 1, 2012 (Thursday): LENTEN WEEKDAY (1)

“LENT: A Time for Confident Prayer”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Est C: 12,14-16,23-25 // Mt 7:7-12

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

Today’s Gospel reading is very meaningful to me. When my 82-year old father was dying of cancer, I asked if there is any Bible passage he would like to propose to the priest for the celebration of the anointing of the sick. He said the one that says “Ask and you will receive … seek and you will find … knock and the door will be opened to you.” The priest from St. Edward Parish in Newark (CA), with pastoral sensitivity, used that Gospel at the Rite of the Anointing of my father. Our family received great comfort and inner strength from the celebration. My father died three weeks later. One beautiful legacy he left was his testimony of confident prayer and total surrender to the divine will.

 

Lent is a time for confident prayer. Jesus encourages us to approach God, our heavenly Father with trust and confidence. God the Father is always ready to give the blessings of the kingdom to those who seek him. The Divine Master teaches us the importance and efficacy of prayer. A human father, even with his imperfections, cares for his children. He will not give something harmful in answer to their requests for bread and fish. How much more, then, will our heavenly Father, the font of all goodness, provide what is good for those who pray to him and trust in him!

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Do we see the importance of prayer of petition? Do we trust in Jesus’ assurance of the efficacy of prayer?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

Jesus Lord, thank you for teaching us to pray and for encouraging us to pray to the heavenly Father with a trusting heart. We pray for the blessings of his kingdom. We believe that we will receive abundant grace, for we have humbly asked for his love, that we will find joy for we have courageously sought his saving will, and that we will enter heaven for we have gently knocked at the door of his compassionate heart. Thank you, Jesus, for accompanying us through this season of Lent with your wisdom and guiding light. You live and reign forever and ever. Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

“For everyone who asks receives; and the one who seeks, finds; and to the one who knocks, the door will be opened.” (Mt 7:8)

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Make a prayer of petition on behalf of someone in need and in distress and complete this prayer with an act of surrender to the compassionate Father’s saving will.

 

***

 

 MARCH 2, 2012 (Friday): LENTEN WEEKDAY (1)

“LENT: A Time to Heal and not to Kill”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Ez 18:21-28 // Mt 5:20-26

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

Jesus, the Divine Master, has a deep perception and comprehensive vision of the covenant law. He teaches that one could violate the prohibition, “Do not kill” not only in actual deed, but also in thought and word. The commandment against murder is violated when one inflicts physical, mental or spiritual injury on another. Anger, abusive language, evil thoughts are just as destructive and offensive as evil deeds. Hence, they must be managed, controlled and healed.

 

Lent is a time to heal and not to kill. We are called to reject violence and overcome sinful attitudes that could degenerate into “acted out” anger. Jesus summons us to spiritual maturity. We must therefore avoid rage, learn to manage our anger and be able to settle differences without violence. We must promote peace and healing by seeking reconciliation. The task of reconciliation is so impelling that it takes precedence over participating in temple worship. Moreover, disputes should be settled amicably to avoid further injury and the horrible punishments imposed by courtroom trials.

 

The following story illustrates an interior attitude that could result in peacefulness and reconciliation.

 

Two friends were walking through the desert. During some point of the journey, they had an argument and one friend slapped the other one in the face. The one who got slapped was hurt, but without saying anything, wrote in the sand: “TODAY MY BEST FRIEND SLAPPED ME IN THE FACE.”

 

They kept on walking until they found an oasis where they decided to take a bath. The one who had been slapped got stuck in the mire and started drowning. But the friend saved him. After he recovered from the near drowning, he wrote on a stone: “TODAY MY BEST FRIEND SAVED MY LIFE.”

 

The friend who had slapped and saved his best friend asked him, “After I hurt you, you wrote in the sand and now, you write on a stone. Why?” The friend replied, “When someone hurts us we should write it down in the sand, where winds of forgiveness can erase it away. But when someone does something good for us, we must engrave it in stone where no wind can ever erase it.”

 

Learn to write your hurts in the sand and to carve your benefits in stone.

 

 

II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

What does God’s command, “Thou shall not kill” mean to me? Did I ever break this command?

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

 

O Jesus, Divine Master, teach us the ways that lead to life. In you, we learn the true meaning of God’s command, “Do not kill”. You call us to renounce violence and all attitudes that inflict harm and injury. Deliver us from evil thoughts, words and deeds. Give us the grace to be kind and merciful for we yearn to be reconciled with God and with our brothers and sisters. We love you, Jesus. We serve you, O loving Lord, now and forever. Amen.

 

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

 

 “Go first and be reconciled with your brother.” (Mt 5:24).

 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Make a serious effort to deal with explosive anger and rage within you. If needed, seek professional help.

 

***

 

March 3, 2012 (Saturday): LENTEN WEEKDAY (1); SAINT KATHERINE DREXEL, virgin, optional memorial

“LENT: A Time to Imitate the Father’s Perfect Love”

 

BIBLE READINGS

Dt 26:16-19 // Mt 5:43-48

 

 

I. BIBLICO-LITURGICAL REFLECTIONS: A Pastoral Tool for the LECTIO

 

In his paschal journey to Easter glory, the Divine Master teaches us that reaching out to people in caring and forgiving love fulfills the covenant and is true righteousness. Jesus interprets the “love of neighbor” command in a radically comprehensive way. The “love of neighbor” imperative includes love of enemies and those outside a traditional group and fellowship. Jesus uses the Father’s universal love and all-embracing providence as the standard and measure of loving. God graciously sends rain and sunshine to all his children, whether good or bad. Jesus exhorts us to imitate the Father’s perfect love. This love is said to be “perfect” because it is complete, whole, entire, undivided – and therefore includes even our “enemies” and “outsiders” or “foreigners”. Indeed, the “perfect” love of God is all-inclusive.

 

We are the children of God. We prove our family belonging by imitating the Father’s love for all. The holiness of our lives radiates the wholeness and completeness of his compassion for all. The Father’s perfect love obliges us to pray for our persecutors and treat with forgiving love those who have harmed us. In Jesus Christ, who revealed the deepest meaning of “perfect love” by his death on the cross, we find the healing strength to forgive.

 

Lent is a propitious time to delve into the Father’s call to perfect love. The following article gives insight into what perfect love entails (cf. Paul Gray, “Finding the Healing Strength to Forgive” in CARENOTES series, St. Meinrad: Abbey Press, 2011, p. 5-6).

 

On a summer morning in 2002, an armed man with unknown motives entered the quiet monastery of Concepcion Abbey in Missouri. He shot and killed two monks and seriously wounded two others before taking his own life in the abbey’s basilica. A few days later, in his homily during the funeral Mass, Abbot Gregory Polan urged the monastic community and all those present to join him in prayer not only for the dead and injured monks, but also for the gunman.

 

“When brutal deeds are enacted, it calls for heroic and radical forgiveness”, he said during the homily. “Such acts of violence as happened here … could only have come from someone in desperate need of help. Hatred, anger, and an unwillingness to forgive only keep us crippled and bound by the evils that surround us. If we endure evil and do not allow it to conquer us, we will share in the victory of Jesus Christ, in the hidden resurrection of Jesus.”

 

Small matter or large, whatever the extent of our hurt, we can be confident that we can forgive because Christ will be present, working in and through us. As we say frequently, “for God all things are possible” (Mt 19:26). That is not to say that forgiving should be quick and easy. It is a process – often long and arduous. The journey of forgiveness begins one day at a time. And it is necessary if we are to move on with our lives. To hold onto our hurts and grievances hurts us. As Bud Welch said, “Vengeance solves no problems.”

 

 

 

 II. POINTS FOR THE EXAMINATION OF THE HEART: A Pastoral Tool for the MEDITATIO

 

Do we try to imitate the Father’s perfect and all-inclusive love for all – even our “enemies”? Are we able to forgive them and pray for them?

 

 

 

III. PRAYING WITH THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the ORATIO

Lord Jesus, you teach us to imitate the Father’s perfect, all-inclusive love. God sends the warming sun and life-giving rain to all – both the good and the wicked. In the same way, we wish to reach out compassionately to all – even our “enemies” and the “foreigners” and “outsiders”. Help us to contemplate the perfect love you revealed by your sacrificial death on the cross. And in your sacred passion, may we find the healing strength to forgive. Be with us as we journey and grow in divine love, day by day. We love you and adore you, now and forever. Amen.

 

IV. INTERIORIZATION OF THE WORD: A Pastoral Tool for the CONTEMPLATIO

 

The following is the bread of the living Word that will nourish us throughout the day. Please memorize it.

            “Love your enemies.” (Mt 5:44) 

 

V. TOWARDS LIFE TRANSFORMATION: A Pastoral Tool for the ACTIO

 

Be gracious to anyone who slighted and/or hurt you and pray for the healing of  the relationship between you and that person.

 

 

***

 

 

Prepared by Sr. Mary Margaret Tapang  PDDM

 

 

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